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Culture

Mikaela Avakian / The Daily Princetonian

2020 was a physically and emotionally taxing year for many of us. The importance of finding outlets to keep us sane and relaxed as the world seemingly explodes cannot be overstated. In the sixth installment of our recommendations series, staff members of The Prospect share various self care activities they have adopted — not only to survive but to thrive — in quarantine. Here are some ways to take care of yourself in 2021.

2020 was a physically and emotionally taxing year for many of us. The importance of finding outlets to keep us sane and relaxed as the world seemingly explodes cannot be overstated. In the sixth installment of our recommendations series, staff members of The Prospect share various self care activities they have adopted — not only to survive but to thrive — in quarantine. Here are some ways to take care of yourself in 2021.


Latest stories

Lawrence Lek, Sinofuturism (1839-2046 AD), 2016 [still] HD video, stereo sound / © Lawrence Lek, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Confronting ‘virtual’ dualities in the work of multimedia artist Lawrence Lek

On Nov. 5, multimedia artist Lawrence Lek gave a public talk hosted by the Princeton Art Museum to discuss the research interests and questions that guide his practice, focusing in particular on three films: “Sinofuturism (1839-2046 AD)“ (2016), “Geomancer” (2017), and “AIDOL” (2019). Lek is the 2020 Sarah Lee Elson International Artist-In-Residence.

THE PROSPECT | December 6

Harsimran Makkad /  The Daily Princetonian

COVID-19 and ‘code red’: understanding the pandemic’s toll on frontline health care workers

Rather than watching the case count on The New York Times or other news outlets, I track the number of cases by the times we are what my family calls “code red,” when we handle clothing with gloves and disinfectant and maintain distance until my mother, an anesthesiologist, has showered.

THE PROSPECT | November 18

A screenshot of a Humanities Sequence precept.
Gabe Robare / The Daily Princetonian

‘How to be Human’: The Humanities Sequence in quarantine

This summer, HUM professors and students expressed their desire to see the course engage more fully with the current moment; as the first semester nears its close, The Daily Princetonian looked into what’s been done so far. Three HUM professors told the ‘Prince’ how they planned for this remarkable semester to replicate the class, to build the community, and to react to the moment. Two current students grade them on their success. All considered what it means to be human and what the humanities still has to teach us, even — perhaps especially — in a moment of crisis. 

THE PROSPECT | November 16

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Sentient satellites? Futuristic football? Jon Bois’s longform speculative fictions “17776” and “20020” push the boundaries of imagination while reflecting on familiar questions.
Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

The surprising poignancy of futuristic football: Jon Bois’ ‘17776’ and ‘20020’

What will football look like in the future? Jon Bois explores this question and much more in his long-form multimedia speculative fiction narratives “17776” and “20020.” Staff writer Molly Cutler ’23 reviews these works and reflects on their surprising power, even for those who aren’t sports enthusiasts.

THE PROSPECT | November 11

Courtesy of Valeria Torres-Olivares ’22

From folk to hip-hop: protest music through the years

Increasingly political content in entertainment is quickly becoming an epochal, cultural trend. But despite its increasing frequency, it continues to be accompanied by staunch, resolute objection: people continue to dislike the invasive nature of today’s politics, and especially its invasion into entertainment and media. But perhaps those voices are forgetting that entertainment has always been political and nowhere is this more clearly seen than in the rich history of protest music in the United States of America.

THE PROSPECT | October 28

David Adjaye, the architect of the new Princeton University Art Museum.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

David Adjaye, architect behind University Art Museum redesign, wins top architecture prize

While there is not a Nobel Prize for Architecture, there are a number of coveted top prizes in the field. One of these prizes, the Royal Gold Medal, was recently awarded to Sir David Adjaye, whose firm Adjaye Associates is designing the new Princeton University Art Museum. In 2018, it was announced that Adjaye and his firm would be behind the redesign of the Princeton University Art Museum, with construction slated to be completed in late 2024.

THE PROSPECT | October 27

Courtesy of Michał Huniewicz / Creative Commons

What Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ gets right — and wrong

The tradition of arranged marriages, its toxic ideologies, and its regressive trends still exist in Indian society, putting pressure on women to compromise, instructing young adults to prioritize societal expectations, and preaching class divisions. These burdens are real and still unapologetically true, as depicted in “Indian Matchmaking.” However, they are certainly not representative of all of South Asian culture.

THE PROSPECT | October 22