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Culture

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On handwriting

As in-person classes resume, Senior Writer Gabriel Robare revisits the longstanding debate of handwritten notes versus typed notes, suggesting that handwriting — although a slow process — allows him to write at the pace he thinks.

As in-person classes resume, Senior Writer Gabriel Robare revisits the longstanding debate of handwritten notes versus typed notes, suggesting that handwriting — although a slow process — allows him to write at the pace he thinks.

THE PROSPECT | 09/07/2021

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Ten things to do in your first week at Princeton

Welcome to the Great Class of 2025! As students quickly find out, Princeton has an abundance of resources, from how to navigate academics to how to manage relationships with peers. With all that the University has to offer, it’s easy to feel like you’ll forget something. So, as you look forward to campus, arrival activities, and orientation, here’s what we feel you should know about Princeton and a few things you might want to check out during your first week here.

Welcome to the Great Class of 2025! As students quickly find out, Princeton has an abundance of resources, from how to navigate academics to how to manage relationships with peers. With all that the University has to offer, it’s easy to feel like you’ll forget something. So, as you look forward to campus, arrival activities, and orientation, here’s what we feel you should know about Princeton and a few things you might want to check out during your first week here.

THE PROSPECT | 08/06/2021

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‘Our moment in the sun’: Transgender alumni reflect on representation, activism, pride

The Daily Princetonian met with seven transgender and non-binary Princeton alumni who graduated Princeton between 1960–2000. Their accounts shed light on how they explored their identities and navigated the University in their time as undergraduates, as well as how they have renegotiated their relationships with the institution in their time away from it.

The Daily Princetonian met with seven transgender and non-binary Princeton alumni who graduated Princeton between 1960-2000. Their accounts shed light on how they explored their identities and navigated the University in their time as undergraduates, as well as how they have renegotiated their relationships with the institution in their time away from it.

FEATURES | 06/07/2021

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Where can I get spicy food in Princeton?

I quickly realized that if I wanted spice, I needed to find it myself — and I’m proud to report that through extensive research and investigation, I have developed a list of restaurants with cheap, tasty, and (most importantly) spicy meals that you can swing by in between classes, after a long week of papers and p-sets, or even on dates! 

I quickly realized that if I wanted spice, I needed to find it myself — and I’m proud to report that through extensive research and investigation, I have developed a list of restaurants with cheap, tasty, and (most importantly) spicy meals that you can swing by in between classes, after a long week of papers and p-sets, or even on dates! 

THE PROSPECT | 05/02/2021

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Coupling Up on Campus: “Romantic partners” navigate a hybrid semester

"This is easily the happiest I’ve ever been in my life,” said Elliot Lee '23 of his current relationship. In a time of enforced distance and isolation, couples, Residential College Advisors, a Peer Health Advisor, and one of the “Datamatch Supreme Cupids” weigh in on the challenges of campus dating.

"This is easily the happiest I’ve ever been in my life,” said Elliot Lee '23 of his current relationship. In a time of enforced distance and isolation, couples, Residential College Advisors, a Peer Health Advisor, and one of the “Datamatch Supreme Cupids” weigh in on the challenges of campus dating.

FEATURES | 04/11/2021

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AAS professor Imani Perry on bridging creative and academic writing

Imani Perry is a Professor of African American Studies. She is affiliated with several departments and programs including the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Law and Public Affairs, and the University Center for Human Values. Free copies of her book “Breathe: A Letter to my Sons” were distributed in Summer 2020 to undergraduates who opted in as part of USG’s anti-racism book initiative. 

Imani Perry is a Professor of African American Studies. She is affiliated with several departments and programs including the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Law and Public Affairs, and the University Center for Human Values. Free copies of her book “Breathe: A Letter to my Sons” were distributed in Summer 2020 to undergraduates who opted in as part of USG’s anti-racism book initiative. 

THE PROSPECT | 04/04/2021

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LCA professor Tracy K. Smith on race and American identity in poetry

Watching the world unfold over the past year, Tracy K. Smith, professor and director of the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in creative writing, has considered the ways she can encourage open and honest conversation surrounding issues at the forefront of our communities.

Watching the world unfold over the past year, Tracy K. Smith, Professor in the Creative Writing Program and Chair of The Lewis Center for the Arts, has considered the ways she can encourage open and honest conversation surrounding issues that are at the forefront of our communities.

THE PROSPECT | 04/01/2021

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Racism, innocent deaths, and Asian-American art

The Atlanta shooting is a clear call for me — and everyone — to take action for the Asian and Asian American communities by raising awareness and working to fight the thinly veiled, yet pervasive racism hiding behind our internal biases and microaggressions.

The Atlanta shooting is a clear call for me — and everyone — to take action for the Asian and Asian American communities by raising awareness and working to fight the thinly veiled, yet pervasive racism hiding behind our internal biases and microaggressions.

THE PROSPECT | 03/31/2021

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Rachel, who's an Asian

“A large part of my aversion to Asian dramas came from generally wanting nothing to do with any kind of Asian culture. Growing up in America, there was always a xenophobic undercurrent to products from my culture: Asian things were weird.”

“A large part of my aversion to Asian dramas came from generally wanting nothing to do with any kind of Asian culture. Growing up in America, there was always a xenophobic undercurrent to products from my culture: Asian things were weird.”

THE PROSPECT | 03/30/2021