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The flag of the People's Republic of China. 
Kathy Smail / Pixy

Professor Rory Truex ’07 explained that since the course “includes material that is banned in China,” he didn’t “want anyone to feel that they were in a position where they had to access banned material in order to succeed in my course.”

Professor Rory Truex ’07 explained that since the course “includes material that is banned in China,” he didn’t “want anyone to feel that they were in a position where they had to access banned material in order to succeed in my course.”


Latest stories

SPIA Dean Cecilia Rouse.
Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton begins search to replace SPIA dean, CEA chair nominee Cecilia Rouse

The committee will identify candidates, conduct the first round of interviews, and send recommendations of finalists to President Christopher L. Eisgruber ’83, who will appoint the new dean with the approval of the Board of Trustees.

The committee will identify candidates, conduct the first round of interviews, and send recommendations of finalists to President Christopher L. Eisgruber ’83, who will appoint the new dean with the approval of the Board of Trustees.

NEWS | December 24

Smallbones / Wikimedia Commons

‘No out-of-pocket costs’ for full financial aid students under Cap and Gown Club’s new policy

For students on financial aid, the policy will cover the difference between Princeton’s upperclass board rate of $9,250 and Cap and Gown’s member charges, which were $9,470 for the 2019–20 academic year.

For students on financial aid, the policy will cover the difference between Princeton’s upperclass board rate of $9,250 and Cap and Gown’s member charges, which were $9,470 for the 2019–2020 academic year.

NEWS | December 21

Professor Robert George.
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Prof. Robert George’s views on gender come under fire after controversial Twitter poll

Prominent conservative professor Robert P. George received backlash on social media last week after posting a poll that questioned pronoun usage, which multiple students who spoke to The Daily Princetonian found transphobic and invalidating of nonbinary and gender-nonconforming experiences. With this latest dispute, the University community continues to grapple with reconciling free speech and inclusivity, particularly when those missions seem at odds. 

Prominent conservative professor Robert P. George received backlash on social media last week after posting a poll that questioned pronoun usage, which multiple students who spoke to The Daily Princetonian found transphobic and invalidating of nonbinary and gender-nonconforming experiences. With this latest dispute, the University community continues to grapple with reconciling free speech and inclusivity, particularly when those missions seem at odds. 

NEWS | December 21

Ashley Fan / The Daily Princetonian

Alumni discuss health inequity and racism at ‘Race in the COVID Era’ event

In a wide-ranging conversation covering health determinants, trust in the COVID-19 vaccine, and solutions to health inequity, three alumni medical experts gathered on Friday to discuss the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on marginalized communities.

In a wide-ranging conversation covering health determinants, trust in the COVID-19 vaccine, and solutions to health inequity, three alumni medical experts gathered on Friday to discuss the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on marginalized communities. 

NEWS | December 20

The Daily Princetonian / Ashley Fan 

U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell ’86 becomes first African American woman to receive Whig-Clio’s James Madison Award

On Friday, Dec. 18, the American Whig-Cliosophic Society (Whig-Clio) presented U.S. Representative Terri Sewell ’86 (D-Ala.) with its highest honor, the James Madison Award for Distinguished Public Service (JMA). Sewell is the first female African American recipient in the honor’s 60-year history.

Representative Terri Sewell was presented with the James Madison Award for Distinguished Public Service by the student organization Whig-Clio. On a Zoom call to accept the award, she discussed her upbringing, various political issues, and her focus on service with the University community. 

NEWS | December 20

Still image from demonstrations conducted in the engineering lab simulating plexiglass dividers' effect on the flow of air particles.  
 Howard Stone / Princeton University 

Mechanical and aerospace engineering professor, graduate students investigate plexiglass, COVID-19 transmission

Nan Xue GS, a fifth-year graduate student in Stone’s lab, explained that such research of speech-driven airflows and fluid mechanics can be useful in understanding how aerosols, especially coronavirus, are transported through air, which he hopes will be helpful in making guidelines and rules to promote safety.

Nan Xue ’21*, a fifth-year graduate student in Stone’s lab, explained that such research of speech-driven airflows and fluid mechanics can be useful in understanding how aerosols, especially coronavirus, are transported through air, which he hopes will be helpful in making guidelines and rules to promote safety.

NEWS | December 20

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The Louis A. Simpson Building, which houses the Davis International Center.
Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton ‘not optimistic’ about international travel this summer

The University is not optimistic about international travel this summer, despite recent vaccination advancements. A final decision on international University-sponsored travel in summer 2021 will be made in May.

The University is not optimistic about international travel this summer, despite recent vaccination advancements. A final decision on international University-sponsored travel in summer 2021 will be made in May.

NEWS | December 20

The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.
Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton study outlines viable, affordable plans for America to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050

Five proposed net-zero emissions pathways involve standard expenditures, and save money in years to come, according to a study by University researchers.

The teams behind the study—led by the co-principal investigators Chris Greig, Eric Larson, and Jesse Jenkins of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment—determined that all five proposed net-zero emissions pathways involve expenditures that remain within the standard bounds of historical annual energy GDP costs, or about 4%-6% of the nation’s GDP. 

NEWS | December 20

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Humanities Council awards grant to launch Native American & Indigenous Studies Working Group

“It was inspiring to hear their goals and their vision for the future of the field at Princeton,” Rivett wrote in an email to the ‘Prince’, and noted that the working group is an attempt to “continue the conversation that the students have largely started and to formalize faculty involvement in their efforts.” 

“It was inspiring to hear their goals and their vision for the future of the field at Princeton,” Rivett wrote in an email to the ‘Prince’, and noted that the working group is an attempt to “continue the conversation that the students have largely started and to formalize faculty involvement in their efforts.” 

NEWS | December 20

Photo Credit: andreas160578 / pixabay

Eight new solar projects to be installed to support Princeton's carbon neutrality goal

The solar arrays will “more than triple the University’s current solar photovoltaic (PV) generating capacity,” increasing this capacity from 5.5 to 19 percent of current electric energy use.

The solar arrays will “more than triple the University’s current solar photovoltaic (PV) generating capacity,” increasing this capacity from 5.5 to 19 percent of current electric energy use.

NEWS | December 20

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

‘Community Walk’ program to patrol neighborhoods with off-campus students, Calhoun tells Princeton Council

For a third of Monday’s three-hour Princeton Council meeting, administrators described the University’s spring plans and fielded questions from Mayor Liz Lempert and Princeton’s six town council members. The Council also approved a nearly $8.5 million voluntary contribution agreement between the University and municipality.

For a third of Monday’s three-hour Princeton Council meeting, administrators described the University’s spring plans and fielded questions from Mayor Liz Lempert and Princeton’s six town council members. The Council also approved a nearly $8.5 million voluntary contribution agreement between the University and municipality.

NEWS | December 20

A photograph of the ongoing construction of two new residential colleges, presented during the Dec. 14 CPUC meeting by University Architect Ron McCoy.

Here’s what happened at the last CPUC meeting of 2020

At the final CPUC meeting of the calendar year, administrators also touched on spring 2021 planning and COVID-19 testing, and attendees heard updates on ongoing efforts to address systemic racism, campus construction, and the Ad Hoc Committee on Sexual Climate, Culture, and Conduct.

At the final CPUC meeting of the calendar year, administrators also touched on spring 2021 planning and COVID-19 testing, and attendees heard updates on ongoing efforts to address systemic racism, campus construction, and the Ad Hoc Committee on Sexual Climate, Culture, and Conduct.

NEWS | December 15

Photo Credit: Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton shortens quarantine duration, launches move-in website

Spring move-in will take place throughout the third week of January for undergraduates, a substantial shift in the timeline following altered quarantine guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the State of New Jersey. In accordance with those guidelines, students who receive negative COVID-19 test results and report no symptoms may only need to quarantine for seven days, rather than 14.

Spring move-in will take place throughout the third week of January for undergraduates, a substantial shift in the timeline following altered quarantine guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the State of New Jersey. In accordance with those guidelines, students who receive negative COVID-19 test results and report no symptoms may only need to quarantine for seven days, rather than 14.

NEWS | December 11