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Obituaries

Denise Applewhite / Office of Communications

Working with him “was the most inspiring and one of the most enjoyable experiences of my 40+ years in Princeton classrooms,” Professor Edwin Turner wrote. “He routinely both infected our students with his deep and passionate excitement for science and effectively encouraged them to pursue their own intellectual interests with confidence in their abilities and a sense of adventure.”

Working with him “was the most inspiring and one of the most enjoyable experiences of my 40+ years in Princeton classrooms,” Professor Edwin Turner wrote. “He routinely both infected our students with his deep and passionate excitement for science and effectively encouraged them to pursue their own intellectual interests with confidence in their abilities and a sense of adventure.”


“George Shultz in 2017 at the Marines Memorial Club in San Francisco” by Christopher Michel / CC BY-SA

Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz ’42 dies at 100

Elder statesman George P. Shultz, who served as U.S. Secretary of State under President Ronald Reagan and helped bring an end to the Cold War, died at his home in Stanford, California on February 6. He was 100 years old.

Elder statesman George P. Shultz, who served as U.S. Secretary of State under President Ronald Reagan and helped bring an end to the Cold War, died at his home in Stanford, California on February 6. He was 100 years old.

NEWS | February 15

Professor Tom Roche
Photo courtesy of Robert "Bo" Smith

Professor Thomas Roche Jr., Renaissance scholar and ‘generous teacher,’ dies at 89

“[Roche] was the consummate host, the consummate professor, the consummate Spencerian, the consummate mentor, an extraordinary friend. And one of the most caring, wicked, hilarious, big hearted people I know,” reflected John Smelcer ’98, a founding member of Princeton Shakespeare Company (PSC), in an email to The Daily Princetonian. 

NEWS | 05/21/2020

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Freeman Dyson in his office at the Institute for Advanced Study in the spring of 2019.

Venerated mathematical physicist Freeman J. Dyson dies at 96

Despite his mathematical contributions to the theories of quantum electrodynamics, Dyson did not receive the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics alongside Feynman, Schwinger, and Tomonaga. The theoretical physicist Steven Weinberg GS ’57, who shared the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physics, told the New York Times in 2009 that the Nobel Prize Committee “fleeced” Dyson by not awarding him a prize for his work on quantum electrodynamics.

NEWS | 03/05/2020