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Columns

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

“The Program in Creative Writing still requires applications for all of its classes, including introductory ones, and most of the literary publications on campus require applications as well. There is also this stark white reality, both figuratively and often demographically: creative writing at Princeton is pretentious and centered on ways of writing that descend from Western ‘high art’ traditions construed as objectively superior to all other forms.” 

“The Program in Creative Writing still requires applications for all of its classes, including introductory ones, and most of the literary publications on campus require applications as well. There is also this stark white reality, both figuratively and often demographically: creative writing at Princeton is pretentious and centered on ways of writing that descend from Western ‘high art’ traditions construed as objectively superior to all other forms.”  


The entrance to the Department of Public Safety.
Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton should change the prox system students use to enter their dorms

“Removing the prox part of entering one’s dorm does not mean we must sacrifice the extra security that it can bring. There are many other methods that the University can implement that function more effectively than the current system, while bringing the same level of security.”

“Removing the prox part of entering one’s dorm does not mean we must sacrifice the extra security that it can bring. There are many other methods that the University can implement that function more effectively than the current system, while bringing the same level of security.”

OPINION | November 22

Morrison Hall, home of the U. undergraduate admissions office.
Nick Donnoli / Office of Communications

Make the decision to get rid of Early Decision

“ Restrictive EA is also the most realistic alternative for colleges to switch to, as many universities will still be concerned with their yield, or the percentage of students who choose to attend the university after being accepted. Harvard and Yale also offer EA; it’s time that the rest of the Ivy League — Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Columbia, and the University of Pennsylvania — as well as other colleges, do the same.”

“Restrictive EA is also the most realistic alternative for colleges to switch to, as many universities will still be concerned with their yield, or the percentage of students who choose to attend the university after being accepted. Harvard and Yale also offer EA; it’s time that the rest of the Ivy League — Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Columbia, and the University of Pennsylvania — as well as other colleges, do the same.”

OPINION | November 21

 “St. Basil’s Cathedral on Red Square in Moscow” by Artem Beliakin / CC BY 1.0

Pushkin not Putin: Depoliticizing the Russian language

“As a Russian heritage speaker I firmly believe that the Russian language has value outside of its strategic positioning as the language of the enemy. Russian — just like every other language — is a language of love and dreams, thought and discovery, culture and art, family and friends. It is a language of living, not of fighting.”

“As a Russian heritage speaker I firmly believe that the Russian language has value outside of its strategic positioning as the language of the enemy. Russian — just like every other language — is a language of love and dreams, thought and discovery, culture and art, family and friends. It is a language of living, not of fighting.”

OPINION | November 21

Abby de Riel / The Daily Princetonian

The danger of blanket statements

“It can be argued that the short and catchy nature of slogan-like short phrases is a necessary attribute, crucial to achieving the objectives of garnering attention, spreading awareness, and recruiting support for said movement. Yet, it is exactly because these movements and sentiments are reduced to short terms and phrases that they result in polarized debate and ultimately hinder the accruing of support.”

“It can be argued that the short and catchy nature of slogan-like short phrases is a necessary attribute, crucial to achieving the objectives of garnering attention, spreading awareness, and recruiting support for said movement. Yet, it is exactly because these movements and sentiments are reduced to short terms and phrases that they result in polarized debate and ultimately hinder the accruing of support.”

OPINION | November 17

Students chat as they stroll down McCosh Walk at dusk during midterms week. 
Natalia Maidique / The Daily Princetonian

Instead of empathy, try compassion

“Thus, as each of us endeavor to support and comfort our friends as the semester comes to an end, I suggest a way to help them without hurting ourselves. Instead of empathy, try compassion.”

“Thus, as each of us endeavor to support and comfort our friends as the semester comes to an end, I suggest a way to help them without hurting ourselves. Instead of empathy, try compassion.”

OPINION | November 15

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Students gather for JRN 445: Investigative Journalism — Accountability Reporting
Ashley Fan / The Daily Princetonian

Reactions: Princeton may loosen the mask mandate ... after classes end

For the Reactions series, columnists respond to the University’s announcement that the mask mandate will be reconsidered and potentially relaxed ten days after Thanksgiving Break ends. 

For the Reactions series, columnists respond to the University’s announcement that the mask mandate will be reconsidered and potentially relaxed ten days after Thanksgiving Break ends. 

OPINION | November 14

Whig Hall under the faint glow of a Tuesday morning sunrise.Timothy Park / The Daily Princetonian

The ‘Princeton Plague’ goes national

“At Princeton, we often wonder if our physical and mental struggles, along with how we choose to cope with and manage them, are ‘normal’ or ‘legitimate.’ Consequently, we continue to attend classes even when we shouldn’t from a medical or self-care perspective, endangering ourselves and those around us. As arduous as the academic environment may be, we do not make such choices out of necessity alone.” 

“At Princeton, we often wonder if our physical and mental struggles, along with how we choose to cope with and manage them, are ‘normal’ or ‘legitimate.’ Consequently, we continue to attend classes even when we shouldn’t from a medical or self-care perspective, endangering ourselves and those around us. As arduous as the academic environment may be, we do not make such choices out of necessity alone.” 

OPINION | November 11

Visitors walk Princeton's campus in November.
Angel Kou / The Daily Princetonian

Life after COVID-19

“If the period following the Black Death is any indication of what is possible after COVID, then we can probably bet that our ideas will take some time to come to fruition. But, likewise, if the Lollards and the peasants who stormed London in 1381 have anything to teach us, it’s that ideas, once loosed, are hard to contain again — that is, so long as we don’t accept a return to anything like normal.”

“If the period following the Black Death is any indication of what is possible after COVID, then we can probably bet that our ideas will take some time to come to fruition. But, likewise, if the Lollards and the peasants who stormed London in 1381 have anything to teach us, it’s that ideas, once loosed, are hard to contain again — that is, so long as we don’t accept a return to anything like normal.”

OPINION | November 10

Angel Kuo / The Daily Princetonian

Statues play a role in preserving our collective memory

“Both around our campus and the nation, we must stop selectively honoring people for certain goods and ignoring the bad and instead remember them for everything they did — who they helped and who they hurt.”

“Both around our campus and the nation, we must stop selectively honoring people for certain goods and ignoring the bad and instead remember them for everything they did — who they helped and who they hurt.”

OPINION | November 9

McCosh Health Center
Julian Gottfried / The Daily Princetonian

An issue bigger than the ‘Princeton plague’: Getting sick at Princeton means a lack of support for its students

“Furthermore, students who are sick — especially those who find themselves sick in circumstances that seemingly do not leave room for accommodation — are not asking for anything unreasonable, or even for a ‘free pass’ or ‘an easy way out.’ They are asking for the well-deserved time to recover, so they are able to return to class in proper health.”

“Furthermore, students who are sick — especially those who find themselves sick in circumstances that seemingly do not leave room for accommodation — are not asking for anything unreasonable, or even for a ‘free pass’ or ‘an easy way out.’ They are asking for the well-deserved time to recover, so they are able to return to class in proper health.” 

OPINION | November 8