Wednesday, January 26

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Retrospectives

Photos from the April 1995 protests to establish Asian American Studies and Latino Studies programs
Poaning Wu / The Daily Princetonian

As AASA advocates for expanding the Asian American Studies program in light of a rise of violence against Asians in the U.S., The Daily Princetonian tracks the struggle for representation on campus back to 1988.

As AASA advocates for expanding the Asian American Studies program in light of a rise of violence against Asians in the U.S., The Daily Princetonian tracks the struggle for representation on campus back to the 1988.


Members of the Class of 1973 hold up a "Coeducation Begins" banner at the Pre-Rade.
Photo Credit: Zachary Shevin / The Daily Princetonian

50 years of women: Susan Belman ’73 and Cassandra James ’23

In 1969, a group of female undergraduates arrived on Princeton’s campus. In 1973, they became the first women to graduate from the University. This is the first installation in a series commemorating 50 years of women at Princeton; each article will chronicle the experience of one woman from the Class of 1973 and one from the Class of 2023. 

NEWS | 12/12/2019

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Source: Charlotte Adamo / The Daily Princetonian

A walk past Nassau: the historically black Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood

Beyond FitzRandolph Gate, the hustle and bustle of Nassau Street — full of trendy restaurants, University apparel shops, and retail chains — serve as the facade of the town, the first image that tourists, visitors, and University students encounter upon leaving campus grounds. But unbeknownst to many non-residents, past Nassau lies a history of segregation and an ongoing struggle to preserve the culture of the town’s historically African-American Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, whose first inhabitants settled in the 1680s.

NEWS | 03/08/2019

A sign on the doors to New South reads “This bldg has been liberated by ABC.” Source: The Daily Princetonian Larry Dupraz Digital Archives.

Liberating New South: How black student activists inspired change through protest

At 7 a.m. on March 11, 1969, four students lurked in the weeds in front of the New South Building. Shortly afterwards, over 40 black students from the Association of Black Collegians (ABC) rushed the building, according to a log from the Department of Public Information. The students then chained the north doors of the building shut and secured the east doors with a mop.

NEWS | 03/07/2019