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Aster Zhang


Aster Zhang / The Daily Princetonian

Combining piano and tap dance, Tao, Teicher stun and reinvent at Richardson Hall

This is the kind of music that overturns what you thought you knew about everything you’ve heard before. It makes you, sitting up on stage with the performers, think, “Jesus, what have I been listening to for my entire life?” 

This is the kind of music that overturns what you thought you knew about everything you’ve heard before. It makes you, sitting up on stage with the performers, think, “Jesus, what have I been listening to for my entire life?” 


The Effron Music Building of the Lewis Center for the Arts.
Photo Credit: Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

On listening to foreign music: Why songs matter beyond their lyrics

For The Prospect, Associate Editor Aster Zhang reflects on why they enjoy listening to foreign music, even when it’s in a language they don’t understand — finding freedom in not understanding any particular narrative in a song.

For The Prospect, Associate Editor Aster Zhang reflects on why they enjoy listening to foreign music, even when it’s in a language they don’t understand — finding freedom in not understanding any particular narrative in a song.


 Lorde performs on Sept. 28, 2013 at Showbox at the Market during the Decibel Festival in Seattle, Wash.
“Lorde in Seattle 2013 - 2” by Kirk Stauffer / CC BY-SA 3.0

‘Solar Power’: predictable to a fault

Lorde released her third studio album “Solar Power” on Aug. 20. “Solar Power” is a marked shift from the musical identity Lorde has cultivated among her following with her critically-acclaimed albums “Pure Heroine” (2013) and “Melodrama” (2017).  

Lorde released her third studio album “Solar Power” on Aug. 20. “Solar Power” is a marked shift from the musical identity Lorde has cultivated among her following with her critically-acclaimed albums “Pure Heroine” (2013) and “Melodrama” (2017).  


Courtesy of Jake Turney

Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason: Chamber music with intimacy

During a period in which a pandemic has restricted communication, both verbal and musical in nature, brother-sister cellist and pianist duo Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason performed a program of chamber works rich in interaction, comprised of works by Beethoven, Saint-Saëns, and Rachmaninoff, that spanned the widest possible breadth of the Romantic period. 


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