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Sentient satellites? Futuristic football? Jon Bois’s longform speculative fictions “17776” and “20020” push the boundaries of imagination while reflecting on familiar questions.
Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

The surprising poignancy of futuristic football: Jon Bois’ ‘17776’ and ‘20020’

What will football look like in the future? Jon Bois explores this question and much more in his long-form multimedia speculative fiction narratives “17776” and “20020.” Staff writer Molly Cutler ’23 reviews these works and reflects on their surprising power, even for those who aren’t sports enthusiasts.

THE PROSPECT | November 11

Courtesy of Valeria Torres-Olivares ’22

From folk to hip-hop: protest music through the years

Increasingly political content in entertainment is quickly becoming an epochal, cultural trend. But despite its increasing frequency, it continues to be accompanied by staunch, resolute objection: people continue to dislike the invasive nature of today’s politics, and especially its invasion into entertainment and media. But perhaps those voices are forgetting that entertainment has always been political and nowhere is this more clearly seen than in the rich history of protest music in the United States of America.

THE PROSPECT | October 28

David Adjaye, the architect of the new Princeton University Art Museum.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

David Adjaye, architect behind University Art Museum redesign, wins top architecture prize

While there is not a Nobel Prize for Architecture, there are a number of coveted top prizes in the field. One of these prizes, the Royal Gold Medal, was recently awarded to Sir David Adjaye, whose firm Adjaye Associates is designing the new Princeton University Art Museum. In 2018, it was announced that Adjaye and his firm would be behind the redesign of the Princeton University Art Museum, with construction slated to be completed in late 2024.

THE PROSPECT | October 27

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Courtesy of Michał Huniewicz / Creative Commons

What Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ gets right — and wrong

The tradition of arranged marriages, its toxic ideologies, and its regressive trends still exist in Indian society, putting pressure on women to compromise, instructing young adults to prioritize societal expectations, and preaching class divisions. These burdens are real and still unapologetically true, as depicted in “Indian Matchmaking.” However, they are certainly not representative of all of South Asian culture.

THE PROSPECT | October 22

Photo courtesy of Luke Momo

Processing race: navigating social media activism as a NBPOC

Conceptualizing race and racism inherently creates a set of paradoxes. It asks us to recognize that racism impacts everyone, but that it impacts everyone differently; it asks us to disassociate from our own racial identity/ies to see the human in each other, but to also celebrate the individuality in our human experiences; it both unites and divides us, because the problem is divisive but the solution is unity.

THE PROSPECT | June 14

As the anonymous @lonelycovidtiger, Jeongmin “JM” Cho ’21 spent the last two months documenting on-campus life amid the pandemic.
Photo by Jeongmin Cho ’21

Q&A with @lonelycovidtiger: Jeongmin ‘JM’ Cho ’21

Jeongmin “JM” Cho ’21, the student behind the Instagram account @lonelycovidtiger, opens up about documenting campus life amid COVID-19. “I hope we will be looking back and be able to appreciate the things that we may have otherwise taken for granted — simple things like being able to be with one another, hug your friends, and express appreciation.”

THE PROSPECT | May 15