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Graduate School

Top left: Yeon Soon Shin, photo: Aaron Kurosu Roek. Bottom left: Rolando Masís-Obando. Top, bottom right: VR landscapes, courtesy of Shin and Masís-Obando.

Futuristic Nostalgia with Yeon Soon Shin and Rolando Masís-Obando

In this episode of The Highlights, we’re joined by Yeon Soon Shin and Rolando Masís-Obando. We discuss their paths to graduate work in psychology, their research on how environmental context affects memory, and the virtual reality environments they created to test their ideas.

In this episode of The Highlights, we're joined by Yeon Soon Shin and Rolando Masís-Obando. We discuss their paths to graduate work in psychology, their research on how environmental context affects memory, and the virtual reality environments they created to test their ideas.

PODCAST | 4 days ago

Joshua Angrist in his office.
Mahya Fazel-Zarandi / The Daily Princetonian

Economics Nobel laureate Joshua Angrist GS ’89 discusses causal inference, his time at Princeton

Joshua Angrist GS ’89 was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Economics. He won half of the prize jointly with Guido Imbens “for their methodological contributions to the analysis of causal relationships.”

Joshua Angrist GS ’89 was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Economics. He won half of the prize jointly with Guido Imbens “for their methodological contributions to the analysis of causal relationships.” 

NEWS | October 27

‘Which side are you on?’ with Patricia Hoyos

In this episode of The Highlights, we're joined by Patricia Hoyos, a graduate student in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. We discuss her work on the development of spatial biases, working with children, and her experiences building a graduate project out of undergraduate independent work.

In this episode of The Highlights, we're joined by Patricia Hoyos, a graduate student in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. We discuss her work on the development of spatial biases, working with children, and her experiences building a graduate project out of undergraduate independent work. 

PODCAST | September 29

 
Courtesy of Zhilei Zhao

Decoding Mosquitoes with Zhilei Zhao

In this episode of Princeton Insights: The Highlights, we're joined by Zhilei Zhao, a former graduate student in the McBride Lab at Princeton. We discuss his experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as his study of the delicate neuroscience of mosquitoes and its potential impact on the fight against insect-borne illnesses.

In this episode of Princeton Insights: The Highlights, we're joined by Zhilei Zhao, a former graduate student in the McBride Lab at Princeton. We discuss his experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as his study of the delicate neuroscience of mosquitoes and its potential impact on the fight against insect-borne illnesses.

PODCAST | September 1

McCosh Health Center
Julian Gottfried / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton eliminates free telehealth coverage under Student Health Plan due to end of NJ’s ‘public health emergency’

Originally set to expire by July 31, the pandemic expansions of the SHP — including free telehealth and therapy — were eliminated on July 3 with the end of NJ’s Public Health Emergency. But many undergraduate and graduate students feel that this reduction in healthcare coverage comes too soon.

Originally set to expire by July 31, the pandemic expansions of the SHP — including free telehealth and therapy — were eliminated on July 3 with the end of NJ’s Public Health Emergency. But many undergraduate and graduate students feel that this reduction in healthcare coverage comes too soon.

NEWS | July 10

Courtesy of Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Automating Observations with Talmo Pereira

In this episode of The Highlights, we're joined by Talmo Pereira, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Neuroscience. We discuss the ups and downs of grad school and how the software he is developing is working to unite neuroscience, ecology, and computer science.

In this episode of The Highlights, we're joined by Talmo Pereira, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Neuroscience. We discuss the ups and downs of grad school and how the software he is developing is working to unite neuroscience, ecology, and computer science. 

PODCAST | May 12

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Jeffrey D. Ullman GS '66 (left) and Alfred V. Aho GS '67 (right)
Courtesy of Ullman and Aho, respectively

Ullman GS ’66 and Aho GS ’67 honored with Turing Award

Aho and Ullman are most widely known for their work in developing compilers, a crucial set of tools without which most modern programs operating on personal computers, smartphones, and automobiles would not be able to function. 

Aho and Ullman are most widely known for their work in developing compilers, a crucial set of tools without which most modern programs operating on personal computers, smartphones, and automobiles would not be able to function. 

NEWS | April 7

Denise Applewhite / Office of Communications 

Sarah-Jane Leslie ’07 steps down as Dean of Graduate School

“Sarah-Jane Leslie has been a dynamic and innovative leader for our Graduate School,” said Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber ’83 in a press release. “I am grateful for her distinguished service to this University and, in particular, for her leadership on issues of graduate student diversity and professional development.”

“Sarah-Jane Leslie has been a dynamic and innovative leader for our Graduate School,” said Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber ’83 in a press release. “I am grateful for her distinguished service to this University and, in particular, for her leadership on issues of graduate student diversity and professional development.”

NEWS | March 28

The Louis A. Simpson Building, which houses the Davis International Center.
Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Graduate students, U. react to proposed DHS rule limiting student visas

“By taking their talent, labour and research agendas to US universities, international students contribute to the research output of the US and to its global reputation for educational excellence,” Gordon-Smith wrote. 

In an interview with the ‘Prince,’ PGSU expressed hopes that “the University steps up … not just rhetorically but materially” to “support international students right now, not by further marginalizing them or making this out to be an issue that can be dealt with through rhetoric, through emails and through statements, but by actually making this type of concrete commitment that treats international students as an equally integral part of this community as domestic students.”

NEWS | 10/14/2020

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Dept. of Religion and PIPS suspend graduate school admissions for 2021

The University’s Department of Religion and Program in Population Studies (PIPS) have announced that they will not accept graduate school applications for the fall 2021 cycle in order to better support their current graduate students.  

The University’s Department of Religion and Program in Population Studies (PIPS) have announced that they will not accept graduate school applications for the fall 2021 cycle in order to better support their current graduate students.  

NEWS | 09/23/2020

Graduate students hold signs reading “Vote Yes on DEI” in February.
Photo courtesy of Aaron Charlop-Powers

Graduate students demonstrate as WWS faculty deliberate on diversity requirement

The program would require students to complete one half-term course related to diversity and inclusion from a list pre-authorized by administrators. The proposal takes inspiration from the newly announced Culture and Difference distribution requirement for undergraduate students, which will commence with the Class of 2024 this fall.  

NEWS | 02/26/2020

Cory and Kristin Isaacs with family.
Photo Courtesy of Grace Johnson

Despite increases in aid for students with children, some say it’s not enough

“When I think about GCAP, I think, ‘Gosh, am I looking a gift horse in the mouth?’ All of this is an extreme privilege,” said Kristin Isaacs, the wife of Cory Isaacs, a third-year Ph.D. candidate in the Woodrow Wilson School. “I want to be thankful and I am thankful, but it’s just not enough.”

NEWS | 02/17/2020