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Opinion

GoToVan / Wikimedia Commons

Not scars, but bleeding wounds: A response to Rebekah Adams ’21 of The Princeton Tory

The last thing Black Americans need is one more successful individual to assume a paternalistic role, pointing fingers at the Black community’s faults without addressing why they exist. Being cognizant of discrimination has nothing to do with a “victimhood mentality” as Adams maintains. It has everything to do with breaking free from delusion.

The last thing Black Americans need is one more successful individual to assume a paternalistic role, pointing fingers at the Black community’s faults without addressing why they exist. Being cognizant of discrimination has nothing to do with a “victimhood mentality” as Adams maintains. It has everything to do with breaking free from delusion.

OPINION | January 12

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

Don't let Princeton cut spring break

Simply put, the University would rather implement a preemptive group punishment in order to deter students from traveling, even if it means jeopardizing the student academic experience and mental health. This upcoming semester already promises to be unusually difficult for students, given the pandemic and campus restrictions. These factors should warrant more breaks during what is collectively seen as the harder of the two semesters, not fewer.

Simply put, the University would rather implement a preemptive group punishment in order to deter students from traveling, even if it means jeopardizing the student academic experience and mental health. This upcoming semester already promises to be unusually difficult for students, given the pandemic and campus restrictions. These factors should warrant more breaks during what is collectively seen as the harder of the two semesters, not fewer.

OPINION | January 8

The Capitol building at dusk.
Martin Falbisoner / Wikimedia Commons

Journalism reveals political fractures. It also has the power to heal them.

“Storytelling is not just the job of a journalist; it is the job of a human being. No matter our profession, it is imperative that we commit ourselves to listening to and engaging with the stories of those around us.”

“Storytelling is not just the job of a journalist; it is the job of a human being. No matter our profession, it is imperative that we commit ourselves to listening to and engaging with the stories of those around us.”

OPINION | January 7

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

The truth matters: A response to a former officer’s attempt to disgrace Whig Clio

Terrell Seabrooks, the former Vice President of Whig Clio, responds to a National Review article which alleged censorship of conservative voices. This past year, Whig Clio, the nation’s oldest collegiate political, literary, and debate society, continued to support our founding principles to facilitate healthy debate and encourage open and inclusive discussion.

Terrell Seabrooks ’21, the former Vice President of Whig Clio, responds to a National Review article which alleged censorship of conservative voices. “This past year, Whig Clio, the nation’s oldest collegiate political, literary, and debate society, continued to support our founding principles to facilitate healthy debate and encourage open and inclusive discussion.”

OPINION | January 6

Trigger Mouse / Pixabay

COVID-19 vaccines are here. Now, we must fight to ensure minority populations have equal access.

Now, more than ever, our collective action as students is essential to ensuring the widespread and equitable access of the vaccine. While voting is an integral first step into getting involved in processes of legislation, taking our advocacy one step further is essential in ensuring a sustained and significant change on the federal and legislative levels.

Now, more than ever, our collective action as students is essential to ensure the widespread and equitable access of the vaccine. While voting is an integral first step into getting involved in processes of legislation, taking our advocacy one step further is essential in ensuring a sustained and significant change on the federal and legislative levels.

OPINION | January 6

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Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

COVID could have shuttered the ‘Prince.’ Instead, we found our purpose.

Above all else, we have sought to tell the truth. That commitment requires more of us than just reporting the facts. To render Princeton as all students, especially those of marginalized identities, live and experience it, the ‘Prince’ must be inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist.

Above all else, we have sought to tell the truth. That commitment requires more of us than just reporting the facts. To render Princeton as all students, especially those of marginalized identities, live and experience it, the ‘Prince’ must be inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist.

OPINION | December 30

Novogratz Bridge Year participants in Indonesia.
Marissa Michaels / The Daily Princetonian

After students experienced racism abroad, Bridge Year failed to act. Performative efforts today are too little, too late.

My conversations with Bridge Year alumni reveal the harsh reality that the well-being of students of color has not been a priority for the Bridge Year administration. And now, it appears the administration is only taking action because student concerns have become too loud to ignore.  

OPINION | December 20

Inci Karaaslan / The Daily Princetonian

What Princeton students can learn from selective storytelling in ‘The Crown’

I cannot help but wonder if this is the story Netflix should be telling. Why seek to humanize the leaders of a violent, oppressive empire, while depicting the lives of the Black and brown people they harmed as mere backdrops? I understand that this is perhaps the way those people existed within the lives of royals, but why are we giving these royals the privilege of remaining relevant in our lives? 

OPINION | December 20

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

In praise of his folly: Newman’s empty crusade against elitism

The elitism identified by Newman is all too prevalent. But he is not the antidote; he is its logical extension. The only way to differentiate oneself from Princeton’s elitism is to actually help the world and topple people like Newman from their thrones of self-styled cultural supremacy.  And it is this consciousness, rather than the subpar model of a Gatsby, that should animate any practice that seeks not only to overcome the standard Princeton elitism, but the self-humiliating pretensions of Newman himself.

The elitism identified by Newman is all too prevalent. But he is not the antidote; he is its logical extension. The only way to differentiate oneself from Princeton’s elitism is to actually help the world and topple people like Newman from their thrones of self-styled cultural supremacy.  And it is this consciousness, rather than the subpar model of a Gatsby, that should animate any practice that seeks not only to overcome the standard Princeton elitism, but the self-humiliating pretensions of Newman himself.

OPINION | December 20

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

What we can learn from the Scott Newman controversy

Read in one light, Newman’s account paints a fairly innocuous picture of a naïve young person whose short-term ambitions have repeatedly gotten in the way of his long-term goals. But there is a critical omission in Newman’s public telling of this story: his own agency in navigating a system he condemns as corrupting and beyond repair. 

Read in one light, Newman’s account paints a fairly innocuous picture of a naïve young person whose short-term ambitions have repeatedly gotten in the way of his long-term goals. But there is a critical omission in Newman’s public telling of this story: his own agency in navigating a system he condemns as corrupting and beyond repair. 

OPINION | December 20

McCosh Health Center.
Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

2020: An ugly but necessary memory

With two vaccines for COVID-19 entering new phases of testing, a semester on campus, and a new year fast approaching, some people are justifiably itching to move on. These developments should undoubtedly be celebrated, as should the prospect of a fresh start. But, just like my friend, we cannot forget everything we have been through: Instead, should find creative and healthy ways to catalogue all that has happened in 2020.

OPINION | December 6

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 06: (EXCLUSIVE COVERAGE)   Harry Styles attends The 2019 Met Gala Celebrating Camp: Notes on Fashion at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 06, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/MG19/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue)

Who are these ‘manly men’?

The phrase “bring back manly men” sets our society back years. Men, no matter their assigned sex, should be able to dress how they want. But this is an issue that is bigger than wardrobe. Society perpetuates the idea that men have to be strong or “manly” all the time. The term “manly” already confines men into a box, but this idea actually creates more harm for men themselves. 

OPINION | December 6