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Columns

"Voting in the United States" by Tom Arthur / CC SA 2.0

Confronting Gerrymandering: The Power of Just Data

“It is not enough to take data points as unequivocal truths without questioning the structures that create them. The progress of marginalized communities, from criminal justice reform to electoral reform, rests on being able to achieve this level of contextualization.”

“It is not enough to take data points as unequivocal truths without questioning the structures that create them. The progress of marginalized communities, from criminal justice reform to electoral reform, rests on being able to achieve this level of contextualization.”

OPINION | April 7

22 Chambers Street houses the Princeton University Investment Company (PRINCO).
Ben Ball / The Daily Princetonian

Will Princeton continue to attract ‘the best and the brightest’?

“By seriously addressing the concerns of its students regarding  climate change, Princeton would greatly increase its appeal to deliberating high school seniors, who might have offers of admission from other universities like Columbia and Brown, which have both already divested from fossil fuels.”

“By seriously addressing the concerns of its students regarding  climate change, Princeton would greatly increase its appeal to deliberating high school seniors, who might have offers of admission from other universities like Columbia and Brown, which have both already divested from fossil fuels.”

OPINION | April 7

The South West entrance to Morrison Hall, home of the Office of Admissions.
Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

Expecting financial aid in a broken system: A response to Andi Grene ’24­

“Even if financial aid should be ‘expected,’ the more constructive approach to understanding our aid may be to accept its troubling implications. Princeton’s financial aid students are beneficiaries of immense wealth in a society that does not equitably distribute it, and we may feel a resulting sense of indebtedness, luck, or impostor syndrome that cannot easily be removed. However, such unwelcome feelings may prove our greatest motivator, urging us to reform our nation to make higher education affordable and accessible for future generations.”

“Even if financial aid should be ‘expected,’ the more constructive approach to understanding our aid may be to accept its troubling implications. Princeton’s financial aid students are beneficiaries of immense wealth in a society that does not equitably distribute it, and we may feel a resulting sense of indebtedness, luck, or impostor syndrome that cannot easily be removed. However, such unwelcome feelings may prove our greatest motivator, urging us to reform our nation to make higher education affordable and accessible for future generations.”

OPINION | April 5

A circle on the ground encouraging social distancing
Zachary Shevin / The Daily Princetonian

Maybe too cautious: University regulations during COVID-19 pandemic

“While social distancing is critical for our physical health, the isolation has critical impacts on our mental health in ways that can’t be fixed by logging on to yet another Zoom event. Opportunities for in-person interactions are unnecessarily limited this semester.” 

“While social distancing is critical for our physical health, the isolation has critical impacts on our mental health in ways that can’t be fixed by logging on to yet another Zoom event. Opportunities for in-person interactions are unnecessarily limited this semester.” 

OPINION | April 4

Matt Johnson / Flickr

Governor Kristi Noem vs. Lil Nas X: the ‘white man’s burden’ of conservative Christianity

“The choice to label Lil Nas X as a threat to morality while failing to address the literal, fatal threat a pandemic poses demonstrates a spirituality centered around the holiness of white “saviors.” This attitude has its roots in the exportation of Christianity around the globe through brutal colonial regimes that forced millions to assimilate.”

“The choice to label Lil Nas X as a threat to morality while failing to address the literal, fatal threat a pandemic poses demonstrates a spirituality centered around the holiness of white “saviors.” This attitude has its roots in the exportation of Christianity around the globe through brutal colonial regimes that forced millions to assimilate.”

OPINION | April 1

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Mental health shouldn’t only matter during the pandemic

“There has always been a mental health problem at Princeton and our peer institutions, and it shouldn’t take highly-visible levels of burnout or worse, a tragedy, to address it.”

“There has always been a mental health problem at Princeton and our peer institutions, and it shouldn’t take highly-visible levels of burnout or worse, a tragedy, to address it.”

OPINION | March 31

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Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian 

Thus Spoke the Undergrads: On noisy roommate sex

“Is there a moral issue here? Can sex and sleep be weighed using a utilitarian metric? And what obligation does a roommate have to fulfill the requests of their neighbor? To answer any of these questions, you, our dear questioner, will first have to confront your roommate.”

“Is there a moral issue here? Can sex and sleep be weighed using a utilitarian metric? And what obligation does a roommate have to fulfill the requests of their neighbor? To answer any of these questions, you, our dear questioner, will first have to confront your roommate.”

OPINION | March 31

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

As we celebrate women’s history, let us push for a better future for women at Princeton

“In order to better represent what it means to be a woman at Princeton in 2021, I interviewed female undergraduates about their experiences with gender at Princeton.”

“In order to better represent what it means to be a woman at Princeton in 2021, I interviewed female undergraduates about their experiences with gender at Princeton.”

OPINION | March 30

 Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian 

PART I | A History of American Partisanship

“That consensus does not mean the in-existence of factions. Political parties, while causing division and generating instances of unsavory speech, are necessary as instruments of consensus-making. No one is “above politics.”  

“That consensus does not mean the in-existence of factions. Political parties, while causing division and generating instances of unsavory speech, are necessary as instruments of consensus-making. No one is ‘above politics.’” 

OPINION | March 28

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

The Honor Code is broken

“The Honor Code’s only contribution to the calculus of academic integrity is the fear of the consequences if you get caught. Either way, personal honor doesn’t figure in at all. The problem is simple: the Honor Code is not fundamentally based on honor.”

“The Honor Code’s only contribution to the calculus of academic integrity is the fear of the consequences if you get caught. Either way, personal honor doesn’t figure in at all. The problem is simple: the Honor Code is not fundamentally based on honor.” 

OPINION | March 28

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Tigers below their stripes: A call for Princetonians to remember their pre-Princeton mascots

“I increasingly framed my involvement in terms of the University: Aspects of my life ranging from extracurriculars to friendships all are intimately connected to Princeton. Chairing the conference shed light on the fact that the orange bubble is not so much a physical place as it is a mental space. Many of us subconsciously see the world through orange glasses.”

“I increasingly framed my involvement in terms of the University: Aspects of my life ranging from extracurriculars to friendships all are intimately connected to Princeton. Chairing the conference shed light on the fact that the orange bubble is not so much a physical place as it is a mental space. Many of us subconsciously see the world through orange glasses.”

OPINION | March 25

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Maybe not all men, but all women: It’s time to change our rhetoric about sexual harassment

“Saying ‘not all men’ in response to sexual harassment committed against women is not the right response — learning to correct this argument and be more empathetic toward women’s experiences will make Princeton a safer, more inclusive place. This Women’s History Month should not just be about celebrating how far we’ve come but a reminder about how much farther we must go.” 

“Saying ‘not all men’ in response to sexual harassment committed against women is not the right response — learning to correct this argument and be more empathetic toward women’s experiences will make Princeton a safer, more inclusive place. This Women’s History Month should not just be about celebrating how far we’ve come but a reminder about how much farther we must go.” 

OPINION | March 25

Jon Ort and Mark Dodici / Daily Princetonian  

The benefits of increased transparency on COVID-19 punishments

“Had the University offered clearer messaging as to the way in which it was punishing violations beyond this semester, it could have encouraged many students to make different choices.”

“Had the University offered clearer messaging as to the way in which it was punishing violations beyond this semester, it could have encouraged many students to make different choices.” 

OPINION | March 24

Elisa.rolle / Wikimedia Commons

Princeton’s campus is coming back to life, but what about the rest of America’s universities?

“The truth is, those of us working within the higher education sector have known for a long time that public higher education in America is in crisis. Like so many other inequalities within American society, COVID-19 simply laid bare the extent of that crisis.”

“The truth is, those of us working within the higher education sector have known for a long time that public higher education in America is in crisis. Like so many other inequalities within American society, COVID-19 simply laid bare the extent of that crisis.”

OPINION | March 23

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

The power of anonymity in stories of consent

“It is the necessity of anonymity that reveals how problematic our society remains and uncovers the consequences that still persist in chastising women who speak out about traumatic experiences, which are deeply upsetting and often triggering to relive.”

“It is the necessity of anonymity that reveals how problematic our society remains and uncovers the consequences that still persist in chastising women who speak out about traumatic experiences, which are deeply upsetting and often triggering to relive.”

OPINION | March 22

Seats in McCosh 50, one of the largest lecture halls at the University.
Photo Credit: Lazarena Lazarova / The Daily Princetonian

Let’s talk about burnout

“It would be one thing if the University maintained its lofty standards during the pandemic. But it has actually raised those standards, asking students, faculty, and staff to do more with less.”

“It would be one thing if the University maintained its lofty standards during the pandemic. But it has actually raised those standards, asking students, faculty, and staff to do more with less.”

OPINION | March 22

Morrison Hall, where The Office of Admission is located. 
Courtesy of the Office of Communications

We should expect, not glorify, Princeton’s financial aid

“It is not benevolence that drives Princeton’s suitable aid, but rather a recognition of the obvious. In a world where most universities choose to look away from the clear financial need of their applicants, Princeton chooses to keep its eyes open.” 

“It is not benevolence that drives Princeton’s suitable aid, but rather a recognition of the obvious. In a world where most universities choose to look away from the clear financial need of their applicants, Princeton chooses to keep its eyes open.” 

OPINION | March 21