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Neha Chauhan

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Traditional materials will be used in the new building, as seen in this rendering of the museum’s planned Grand Hall.
Courtesy of Adjaye Associates

U. reveals new Art Museum plans, designed by Sir David Adjaye

Princeton University Art Museum unveiled plans for its new building, designed by Sir David Adjaye. The new museum, which spans three floors and includes nine interlocked pavilions, will be built with stone, bronze, and glass, and can accommodate up to 2,000 people. The project will break ground in May 2021, with an expected completion date of 2024.

Princeton University Art Museum unveiled plans for its new building, designed by Sir David Adjaye. The new museum — which spans three floors and includes nine interlocked pavilions — will be built with stone, bronze, and glass, and can accommodate up to 2,000 people.


Courtesy Shriya Sekhsaria '18

Sekhsaria '18 turns senior thesis into $2.5 million startup Lumhaa

This summer, Shriya Sekhsaria ’18 turned her lifelong interest in collecting memories into a startup company called Lumhaa.  Lumhaa is about recording and sharing memories through a virtual platform. Users can create virtual “memory jars” via text descriptions, audio or video recordings, and images. Today, Lumhaa is worth an estimated $2.5 million.


Michael Wolovick explains potential solution to glacial melting

Sea level rise is a much discussed symptom of climate change. While some ideas for curbing glacial melting have been proposed, few geoengineering solutions have been implemented. However, current research by University postdoctoral research associate Michael Wolovick indicates that there exists a practical solution for glacial melting. Wolovick is investigating glacial sills, or walls made of rock and silt, as a way to block glaciers from exposure to warm water and keep them from melting.


‘Writer to be reckoned with’ Jerkins ’14 talks identity, writing

“Black women are extremely complex. Oftentimes we may be messy, we may be contradictory,”  said Morgan Jerkins ’14. “With this book, I hope that people will read about one black woman’s reality and not think that she speaks for all black women because I am not the arbiter of truth, I cannot monopolize black womanhood, much less blackness.”


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