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David Palomino

Illustration by Payton Croskey / The Daily Princetonian

The South West entrance to Morrison Hall, home of the Office of Admissions.
Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

Expecting financial aid in a broken system: A response to Andi Grene ’24­

“Even if financial aid should be ‘expected,’ the more constructive approach to understanding our aid may be to accept its troubling implications. Princeton’s financial aid students are beneficiaries of immense wealth in a society that does not equitably distribute it, and we may feel a resulting sense of indebtedness, luck, or impostor syndrome that cannot easily be removed. However, such unwelcome feelings may prove our greatest motivator, urging us to reform our nation to make higher education affordable and accessible for future generations.”

“Even if financial aid should be ‘expected,’ the more constructive approach to understanding our aid may be to accept its troubling implications. Princeton’s financial aid students are beneficiaries of immense wealth in a society that does not equitably distribute it, and we may feel a resulting sense of indebtedness, luck, or impostor syndrome that cannot easily be removed. However, such unwelcome feelings may prove our greatest motivator, urging us to reform our nation to make higher education affordable and accessible for future generations.”


Trigger Mouse / Pixabay

Let’s pay our vaccine privilege forward

While much of the world scrambles to acquire vaccines, Princeton University students reside on a major testing and vaccine distribution site. It is a privilege worth examining and remembering for the rest of our lives.

While much of the world scrambles to acquire vaccines, Princeton University students reside on a major testing and vaccine distribution site. It is a privilege worth examining and remembering for the rest of our lives.


When we come back

The Princeton many left, the Princeton many first-years never met, may be shadowed by health measures that leave us aching for our college experience. But in that slow and careful crawl back to normalcy, we might find comfort in people and places we have forgotten. 


The restraint of ‘will you shut up, man?’

Biden’s performance, and the debate as a whole, offers a valuable lesson. The debate demonstrates not only why discourse cannot survive without restraint, but also why restraint can be a powerful tool to display moral character. As students forming Princeton University’s discourse, and as young adults shaping our own personal characters, we cannot minimize this lesson in restraint. Without it, the future we create is more likely to repeat the mistakes of the present.


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