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Self

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Only human: Reflections from a pre-med in a pandemic

“When I tell people that I want to be a doctor, most of the responses I get focus on the clinical and scientific aspects of the job. I’m keenly aware of the fact that I’m viewed as one of those pillars of science and logic — someone who is simply providing the next diagnosis, seeing the next patient, filling out the next chart. But as I’ve learned from this pandemic, it is the resilience, dedication, and paramount concern for the greater good that keeps that pillar standing strong.” 

“When I tell people that I want to be a doctor, most of the responses I get focus on the clinical and scientific aspects of the job. I’m keenly aware of the fact that I’m viewed as one of those pillars of science and logic — someone who is simply providing the next diagnosis, seeing the next patient, filling out the next chart. But as I’ve learned from this pandemic, it is the resilience, dedication, and paramount concern for the greater good that keeps that pillar standing strong.” 

THE PROSPECT | September 19

A view of the New York City skyline shortly after the Towers fell.

Remembering the day the Towers fell

In observance of the 20th anniversary of Sept. 11, The Prospect asked Princeton community members — students, faculty, staff, and alumni — to share brief personal reflections and anecdotes. Responses were edited for concision and clarity. 

In observance of the 20th anniversary of Sept. 11, The Prospect asked Princeton community members — students, faculty, staff, and alumni — to share brief personal reflections and anecdotes. Responses were edited for concision and clarity. 

THE PROSPECT | September 12

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Visiting Princeton’s 9/11 memorial, 20 years after the towers fell

Remembering is something so deeply ingrained into the physical campus in which we make our lives as Princeton students. Still, it’s so easy to walk through its arches and towers and halls without ever taking the time to really contemplate the people and stories the campus embodies.

Remembering is something so deeply ingrained into the physical campus in which we make our lives as Princeton students. Still, it’s so easy to walk through its arches and towers and halls without ever taking the time to really contemplate the people and stories the campus embodies.

THE PROSPECT | September 10

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Triangle's Frosh Week Show and the future soon to begin

“In this instant, the most tangible change I feel is a resurging joy, almost childlike, after a somber year, all thanks to the promise of soon, finally, participating behind the scenes in the Triangle tradition that helped me fall in love with this school and this club when I was only an audience member.” 

“In this instant, the most tangible change I feel is a resurging joy, almost childlike, after a somber year, all thanks to the promise of soon, finally, participating behind the scenes in the Triangle tradition that helped me fall in love with this school and this club when I was only an audience member.”  

THE PROSPECT | August 30

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DISPATCH | What being a camp counselor taught me about life after loss

Reflecting on a summer spent working as a camp counselor in Kentucky, Managing Editor AG McGee writes about coming to terms with grief and how to move on after a major loss.

Reflecting on a summer spent working as a camp counselor in Kentucky, Managing Editor AG McGee writes about coming to terms with grief and how to move on after a major loss.

THE PROSPECT | 08/13/2021

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Washington Road at Night

Barely hanging on

“I’m barely holding on, and I would love for you to leave me alone if you aren’t willing to help.” In a guest submission to The Prospect, Associate Opinion Editor Kristal Grant responds to the administration and faculty’s inadequate and too-late (in)action on students’ mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I’m barely holding on, and I would love for you to leave me alone if you aren’t willing to help.” In a guest submission to The Prospect, Associate Opinion Editor Kristal Grant responds to the administration and faculty’s inadequate and too-late (in)action on students’ mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

THE PROSPECT | 04/27/2021

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The reality of imposter syndrome in the COVID-19 era

“At a time when students, including myself, find themselves questioning their validity, high-achieving universities should emphasize the importance of rest instead of adding to students’ stress.” 

“At a time when students, including myself, find themselves questioning their validity, high-achieving universities should emphasize the importance of rest instead of adding to students’ stress.”  

OPINION | 04/15/2021

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When you silence Asian pain, you light us all on fire

“Today, I'm still wearing my KF94 mask to protect others, but I’ve shed my other mask — the one I wore to convince myself and others that the flames weren’t real. They are real, and the world is on fire — both literally, but also within the millions of minds that white supremacy and racial capitalism set ablaze centuries ago.”

“Today, I'm still wearing my KF94 mask to protect others, but I’ve shed my other mask — the one I wore to convince myself and others that the flames weren’t real. They are real, and the world is on fire — both literally, but also within the millions of minds that white supremacy and racial capitalism set ablaze centuries ago.”

OPINION | 04/08/2021

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Racism, innocent deaths, and Asian-American art

The Atlanta shooting is a clear call for me — and everyone — to take action for the Asian and Asian American communities by raising awareness and working to fight the thinly veiled, yet pervasive racism hiding behind our internal biases and microaggressions.

The Atlanta shooting is a clear call for me — and everyone — to take action for the Asian and Asian American communities by raising awareness and working to fight the thinly veiled, yet pervasive racism hiding behind our internal biases and microaggressions.

THE PROSPECT | 03/31/2021

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Rachel, who's an Asian

“A large part of my aversion to Asian dramas came from generally wanting nothing to do with any kind of Asian culture. Growing up in America, there was always a xenophobic undercurrent to products from my culture: Asian things were weird.”

“A large part of my aversion to Asian dramas came from generally wanting nothing to do with any kind of Asian culture. Growing up in America, there was always a xenophobic undercurrent to products from my culture: Asian things were weird.”

THE PROSPECT | 03/30/2021

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A defense of doing less

“The way I see it, if success in school requires crying on the floor, I don’t want to be successful. Success, I think, is being happy, at any given time. I still think it’s good to work, it’s good to struggle, it’s good to fail.”

“The way I see it, if success in school requires crying on the floor, I don’t want to be successful. Success, I think, is being happy, at any given time. I still think it’s good to work, it’s good to struggle, it’s good to fail.”

THE PROSPECT | 03/28/2021

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Why we should start listening to those ‘minor minorities’

“Watching the anti-Asian violence unfold on the news, I could not help but see my experience with dermatillomania as an allegory for how many Asian Americans, including myself, experience racism. There seems to be a pervasive insecurity that our struggles are unimportant, or simply not worthy of discussion.” 

“Watching the anti-Asian violence unfold on the news, I could not help but see my experience with dermatillomania as an allegory for how many Asian Americans, including myself, experience racism. There seems to be a pervasive insecurity that our struggles are unimportant, or simply not worthy of discussion.” 

THE PROSPECT | 03/28/2021

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It feels like America again

The Prospect associate editor José Pablo Fernández García wrestles with growing up in the age of mass shootings and how a return of such tragedies to the headlines grossly feels like a return to American normalcy.

The Prospect associate editor José Pablo Fernández García wrestles with growing up in the age of mass shootings and how a return of such tragedies to the headlines grossly feels like a return to American normalcy.

THE PROSPECT | 03/25/2021

Paper Towels

A family, paper towels & Princeton

This, if anything, is a story of the frustration I felt in those moments in the car, driving. I was frustrated because seeing that family felt like a failure. Indeed, it was a failure of our society to take care of that family’s most basic needs: food and shelter. This frustration was also very familiar to me after the recent months during which I’ve watched this country dramatically fail to respond to the pandemic: little to no effort to contain the virus, little to no effort to support those most affected. 

This, if anything, is a story of the frustration I felt in those moments in the car, driving. I was frustrated because seeing that family felt like a failure. Indeed, it was a failure of our society to take care of that family’s most basic needs: food, shelter. This frustration was also very familiar to me after the recent months during which I’ve watched this country dramatically fail to respond to the pandemic: little to no effort to contain the virus, little to no effort to support the most affected.

THE PROSPECT | 12/20/2020

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Grief in four corners

With the lockdown and strict quarantine earlier this year, my room has become the very essence of me, an extension of myself. I’ve rearranged it countless times in attempts to mitigate the boundary of who I was when I left for college and who I am now since I returned in the spring of 2020. 

THE PROSPECT | 12/20/2020

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Catching fire in darkness: Celebrating Diwali during a pandemic

I love Diwali for all of the light it forges in my house, for the seven lit candles which sit perfectly aligned on my fireplace for 10 days, for the sweets that cover every square inch of my kitchen counter, for all of the shoes I trip over as guests pile into my home. As an Indian American living in New Jersey, my parents have adapted the way Diwali is typically celebrated. 

THE PROSPECT | 12/06/2020

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DISPATCH | Summer At Last

The sun sets later day by day in the southern hemisphere. By an unfortunate combination of Princeton’s academic calendar and the onset of COVID-19, I have lived through three consecutive autumn/winter cycles, so it’s a refreshing change of scenery to finally roll into summer. This also happens to be the first summer that I will spend on a gap year.

THE PROSPECT | 12/06/2020