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“Peter Singer no Fronteiras do Pensamento Porto Alegre” by Fronteiras do Pensamento / CC BY-SA 2.0

Reading Peter Singer's ‘Famine, Affluence, and Morality’ 50 years later

“Famine, Affluence, and Morality” confronts the reader with their own complacency regarding global suffering, and the passage of time has not led to a heartening perspective. Half a century later, the world is in the midst of a refugee crisis, wars and famines continue to afflict millions, and society is still rife with poverty and inequality.  A modern frame of reference provides a new understanding of what may be necessary to goad the world into action, but we’ll start by reexamining Singer’s reasoning regarding the affluents’ duty to help those in need. 

“Famine, Affluence, and Morality” confronts the reader with their own complacency regarding global suffering, and the passage of time has not led to a heartening perspective. Half a century later, the world is in the midst of a refugee crisis, wars and famines continue to afflict millions, and society is still rife with poverty and inequality.  A modern frame of reference provides a new understanding of what may be necessary to goad the world into action, but we’ll start by reexamining Singer’s reasoning regarding the affluents’ duty to help those in need.  

THE PROSPECT | 6 days ago

Mikaela Avakian / The Daily Princetonian

Five ways to take care of yourself in 2021

2020 was a physically and emotionally taxing year for many of us. The importance of finding outlets to keep us sane and relaxed as the world seemingly explodes cannot be overstated. In the sixth installment of our recommendations series, staff members of The Prospect share various self care activities they have adopted — not only to survive but to thrive — in quarantine. Here are some ways to take care of yourself in 2021.

2020 was a physically and emotionally taxing year for many of us. The importance of finding outlets to keep us sane and relaxed as the world seemingly explodes cannot be overstated. In the sixth installment of our recommendations series, staff members of The Prospect share various self care activities they have adopted — not only to survive but to thrive — in quarantine. Here are some ways to take care of yourself in 2021.

THE PROSPECT | January 21

José Pablo Fernandez García / The Daily Princetonian

For all the grieving tigers

Every time this happens, every time I feel my eyes begin to swell up or my throat tighten a bit as I learn how many more thousands have died in this country alone, I wonder just how many people are setting out on this tragic journey I began about eight years ago.

Every time this happens, every time I feel my eyes begin to swell up or my throat tighten a bit as I learn how many more thousands have died in this country alone, I wonder just how many people are setting out on this tragic journey I began about eight years ago.

THE PROSPECT | January 12

José Pablo Fernández García / The Daily Princetonian 

A family, paper towels & Princeton

This, if anything, is a story of the frustration I felt in those moments in the car, driving. I was frustrated because seeing that family felt like a failure. Indeed, it was a failure of our society to take care of that family’s most basic needs: food and shelter. This frustration was also very familiar to me after the recent months during which I’ve watched this country dramatically fail to respond to the pandemic: little to no effort to contain the virus, little to no effort to support those most affected. 

This, if anything, is a story of the frustration I felt in those moments in the car, driving. I was frustrated because seeing that family felt like a failure. Indeed, it was a failure of our society to take care of that family’s most basic needs: food, shelter. This frustration was also very familiar to me after the recent months during which I’ve watched this country dramatically fail to respond to the pandemic: little to no effort to contain the virus, little to no effort to support the most affected.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

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Sam Johnson / The Daily Princetonian

Grief in four corners

With the lockdown and strict quarantine earlier this year, my room has become the very essence of me, an extension of myself. I’ve rearranged it countless times in attempts to mitigate the boundary of who I was when I left for college and who I am now since I returned in the spring of 2020. 

THE PROSPECT | December 20

Aditi Desai / The Daily Princetonian

Catching fire in darkness: Celebrating Diwali during a pandemic

I love Diwali for all of the light it forges in my house, for the seven lit candles which sit perfectly aligned on my fireplace for 10 days, for the sweets that cover every square inch of my kitchen counter, for all of the shoes I trip over as guests pile into my home. As an Indian American living in New Jersey, my parents have adapted the way Diwali is typically celebrated. 

THE PROSPECT | December 6

Harsimran Makkad /  The Daily Princetonian

COVID-19 and ‘code red’: understanding the pandemic’s toll on frontline health care workers

Rather than watching the case count on The New York Times or other news outlets, I track the number of cases by the times we are what my family calls “code red,” when we handle clothing with gloves and disinfectant and maintain distance until my mother, an anesthesiologist, has showered.

THE PROSPECT | November 18

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

Texting home

Before leaving home, my phone history with my parents was sparse, to say the least. Now that I’m thousands of miles away, of course I’m texting my parents more. But as a high schooler, I would never have guessed just how often I would find myself, in college, reaching for the phone to contact my mom. 

THE PROSPECT | November 12

Katie Rohrbaugh / The Daily Princetonian

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is not the stress reliever I thought it would be

When Animal Crossing: New Horizons came out this past March, I thought the game would be a perfect counterbalance to the stresses of a wildly uncertain year. I cannot stress this enough: I absolutely love this game. But instead of becoming an outlet for my stress, I found that the New Horizons allowed me to repackage it under the facade of playing a video game. 

THE PROSPECT | November 2

John Ehling / The Daily Princetonian

Reflections from a first-year: Establishing friendships over Zoom

In a normal semester, students may have been able to sow the first seeds of a budding friendship by turning to a peer in an orientation hall or large lecture class to exchange a few words. Now, side conversations have become relegated to the Zoom chat, where a quick private message about an assignment might just spark the beginnings of a new connection.

THE PROSPECT | November 1

Claire Thornton / The Daily Princetonian

A case for cooking

In a semester where we’re all spending overwhelming amounts of time staring at our computers, it is absolutely critical to find a screen-free activity that also provides genuine respite from schoolwork. Cooking is by no means the only option. But we all have to eat.

THE PROSPECT | October 29