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Opinion

Vice President Kamala Harris
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

It’s pronounced “comma-la”. Get it right.

Quite frequently during the Biden-Harris campaign did I hear one of my friends mispronounce Harris’ name; I am sure Princeton’s ears will be no strangers to the occasional “Ka-MA-la” over the next four years. I believe we have a civic and moral duty to kindly correct this mistake when we hear it.

Quite frequently during the Biden-Harris campaign did I hear one of my friends mispronounce Harris’ name; I am sure Princeton’s ears will be no strangers to the occasional “Ka-MA-la” over the next four years. I believe we have a civic and moral duty to kindly correct this mistake when we hear it.

OPINION | January 31

A circle on the ground encouraging social distancing
Zachary Shevin / The Daily Princetonian

The virus may have crushed our traditions. It has not crushed our spirit.

Because of COVID-19 restrictions, the ‘Prince’ will remain digital for the time being. The broadsheet that many of us looked forward to seeing each morning will be missed. But as we well know, the lack of physical presence means nothing for the spirit of our work.

Because of COVID-19 restrictions, the ‘Prince’ will remain digital for the time being. The broadsheet that many of us looked forward to seeing each morning will be missed. But as we well know, the lack of physical presence means nothing for the spirit of our work.

OPINION | January 26

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

We should have a voice in the University’s COVID response

“Let us be clear. We do not oppose the return of the students. What we want is an end to the unilateral manner in which the University makes decisions on matters concerning the entire community,” guest contributor Marc Schorin writes on behalf of the Princeton Anti-Austerity Coalition.

“Let us be clear. We do not oppose the return of the students. What we want is an end to the unilateral manner in which the University makes decisions on matters concerning the entire community,” guest contributor Marc Schorin writes on behalf of the Princeton Anti-Austerity Coalition.

OPINION | January 24

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

Editorial Board: Protecting public health can start with a conversation

While understanding that blatant disregard for public well-being should be disciplined, this Board sees empathetic dialogue as a more effective and equitable first option for dealing with pandemic policy transgressions and encourages community members to educate one another.

While understanding that blatant disregard for public wellbeing should be disciplined, this Board sees empathetic dialogue as a more effective and equitable first option for dealing with pandemic policy transgressions and encourages community members to educate one another.

OPINION | January 24

Michael Vadon / Wikimedia Commons

Editorial Board: Why Princeton cannot stay silent on Sen. Ted Cruz ’92

“We call on President Eisgruber to acknowledge the racist nature of this voter-fraud disinformation campaign and to explicitly condemn Cruz for his role in it.”

“We call on President Eisgruber to acknowledge the racist nature of this voter-fraud disinformation campaign and to explicitly condemn Cruz for his role in it.”

OPINION | January 21

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

Why Whig-Clio should strip Ted Cruz ’92 of the James Madison Award

As we have seen, verbal condemnation alone has lost practically all effectiveness in keeping politicians accountable. We must back our words with actions, otherwise we give a free pass to those in power. While I applaud Whig-Clio for condemning the protests and Cruz’s actions, this is insufficient. I assert that Whig-Clio must withdraw the James Madison Award as well.

As we have seen, verbal condemnation alone has lost practically all effectiveness in keeping politicians accountable. We must back our words with actions, otherwise we give a free pass to those in power. While I applaud Whig-Clio for condemning the protests and Cruz’s actions, this is insufficient. I assert that Whig-Clio must withdraw the James Madison Award as well.

OPINION | January 21

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TapTheForwardAssist | Wikimedia Commons

America isn't better than the events of Jan. 6

After further interrogation, however, I realized that instead of the question, ‘Is this who we really are’, the question really worth asking is: ‘Why are we so surprised that this is the country we live in?’. 

After further interrogation, however, I realized that instead of the question, “Is this who we really are?”, the question really worth asking is: “Why are we so surprised that this is the country we live in?” 

OPINION | January 21

The Capitol building at dusk.
Martin Falbisoner / Wikimedia Commons

America’s political future depends on non-political stakeholders

College campuses are prime locations for political discussions no matter what your major is. But we need to consider how to bring that mindset beyond the theoretical fireside debates of Princeton’s dining halls and into our future occupations.

College campuses are prime locations for political discussions no matter what your major is. But we need to consider how to bring that mindset beyond the theoretical fireside debates of Princeton’s dining halls and into our future occupations.

OPINION | January 19

Shamila Chaudhary / Flickr

The case for defunding the police after the Jan. 6 coup attempt

The tepid police response to the attempted coup, juxtaposed with their vicious response to other anti-racist protests, shows that the harms police cause to communities of color persist. But, they are harms we are ready to live without. 

The tepid police response to the attempted coup, juxtaposed with their vicious response to other anti-racist protests, shows that the harms police cause to communities of color persist. But, they are harms we are ready to live without. 

OPINION | January 18

Sen. Ted Cruz ’92 sits for an official portrait.
Courtesy of Ted Cruz Congressional website

Princeton alumni condemn Sen. Ted Cruz ’92

Senator Ted Cruz ’92 has shown the utmost disservice to our Nation and has brought shame to our University and all we hold dear. As alumni, we are saddened and ashamed that he willfully aided and abetted an insurrection against our country, promoted lies and conspiracy theories to overturn an election, and violated his oath of office to protect a person rather than our Constitution. In so doing, he has brought shame to himself and the University community. 

Senator Ted Cruz ’92 has shown the utmost disservice to our Nation and has brought shame to our University and all we hold dear. As alumni, we are saddened and ashamed that he willfully aided and abetted an insurrection against our country, promoted lies and conspiracy theories to overturn an election, and violated his oath of office to protect a person rather than our Constitution. In so doing, he has brought shame to himself and the University community. 

OPINION | January 14

GoToVan / Wikimedia Commons

Not scars, but bleeding wounds: A response to Rebekah Adams ’21 of The Princeton Tory

The last thing Black Americans need is one more successful individual to assume a paternalistic role, pointing fingers at the Black community’s faults without addressing why they exist. Being cognizant of discrimination has nothing to do with a “victimhood mentality” as Adams maintains. It has everything to do with breaking free from delusion.

The last thing Black Americans need is one more successful individual to assume a paternalistic role, pointing fingers at the Black community’s faults without addressing why they exist. Being cognizant of discrimination has nothing to do with a “victimhood mentality” as Adams maintains. It has everything to do with breaking free from delusion.

OPINION | January 12

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

Don't let Princeton cut spring break

Simply put, the University would rather implement a preemptive group punishment in order to deter students from traveling, even if it means jeopardizing the student academic experience and mental health. This upcoming semester already promises to be unusually difficult for students, given the pandemic and campus restrictions. These factors should warrant more breaks during what is collectively seen as the harder of the two semesters, not fewer.

Simply put, the University would rather implement a preemptive group punishment in order to deter students from traveling, even if it means jeopardizing the student academic experience and mental health. This upcoming semester already promises to be unusually difficult for students, given the pandemic and campus restrictions. These factors should warrant more breaks during what is collectively seen as the harder of the two semesters, not fewer.

OPINION | January 8

The Capitol building at dusk.
Martin Falbisoner / Wikimedia Commons

Journalism reveals political fractures. It also has the power to heal them.

“Storytelling is not just the job of a journalist; it is the job of a human being. No matter our profession, it is imperative that we commit ourselves to listening to and engaging with the stories of those around us.”

“Storytelling is not just the job of a journalist; it is the job of a human being. No matter our profession, it is imperative that we commit ourselves to listening to and engaging with the stories of those around us.”

OPINION | January 7

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

The truth matters: A response to a former officer’s attempt to disgrace Whig Clio

Terrell Seabrooks, the former Vice President of Whig Clio, responds to a National Review article which alleged censorship of conservative voices. This past year, Whig Clio, the nation’s oldest collegiate political, literary, and debate society, continued to support our founding principles to facilitate healthy debate and encourage open and inclusive discussion.

Terrell Seabrooks ’21, the former Vice President of Whig Clio, responds to a National Review article which alleged censorship of conservative voices. “This past year, Whig Clio, the nation’s oldest collegiate political, literary, and debate society, continued to support our founding principles to facilitate healthy debate and encourage open and inclusive discussion.”

OPINION | January 6

Trigger Mouse / Pixabay

COVID-19 vaccines are here. Now, we must fight to ensure minority populations have equal access.

Now, more than ever, our collective action as students is essential to ensuring the widespread and equitable access of the vaccine. While voting is an integral first step into getting involved in processes of legislation, taking our advocacy one step further is essential in ensuring a sustained and significant change on the federal and legislative levels.

Now, more than ever, our collective action as students is essential to ensure the widespread and equitable access of the vaccine. While voting is an integral first step into getting involved in processes of legislation, taking our advocacy one step further is essential in ensuring a sustained and significant change on the federal and legislative levels.

OPINION | January 6

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

COVID could have shuttered the ‘Prince.’ Instead, we found our purpose.

Above all else, we have sought to tell the truth. That commitment requires more of us than just reporting the facts. To render Princeton as all students, especially those of marginalized identities, live and experience it, the ‘Prince’ must be inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist.

Above all else, we have sought to tell the truth. That commitment requires more of us than just reporting the facts. To render Princeton as all students, especially those of marginalized identities, live and experience it, the ‘Prince’ must be inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist.

OPINION | December 30

Novogratz Bridge Year participants in Indonesia.
Marissa Michaels / The Daily Princetonian

After students experienced racism abroad, Bridge Year failed to act. Performative efforts today are too little, too late.

My conversations with Bridge Year alumni reveal the harsh reality that the well-being of students of color has not been a priority for the Bridge Year administration. And now, it appears the administration is only taking action because student concerns have become too loud to ignore.  

OPINION | December 20