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Arts

Courtesy of Art Streiber

Grammy-award winning composer explores intersections between personal and historical narrative

Through his composition and the chosen lyrics, Tilson Thomas is able to clearly communicate and connect with the audience, crafting a beautiful musical story for the listener.

Through his composition and the chosen lyrics, Tilson Thomas is able to clearly communicate and connect with the audience, crafting a beautiful musical story for the listener. 

THE PROSPECT | September 15

The Lewis Center for the Arts in the early evening.
Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

A look behind the scenes of “REACTIVATING MEMORY, ‘Shuffle Along’ and the Tulsa Race Massacre: A Centennial Symposium”

In honor of two centennial anniversaries, the Lewis Center for the Arts and CLASSIX have teamed up to present “REACTIVATING MEMORY, ‘Shuffle Along’ and the Tulsa Race Massacre: A Centennial Symposium.” 

In honor of two centennial anniversaries, the Lewis Center for the Arts and CLASSIX have teamed up to present “REACTIVATING MEMORY, ‘Shuffle Along’ and the Tulsa Race Massacre: A Centennial Symposium.”

THE PROSPECT | September 9

Gabriel Robare / The Daily Princetonian

Why you should memorize poetry

"To memorize poetry is to make it sacred, to create its full meaning, and to let it grow within one’s own mind," writes Senior Writer Gabriel Robare, encouraging readers to consider the long-term merits of taking the time to memorize a personal mantra — poetry, or otherwise.

"To memorize poetry is to make it sacred, to create its full meaning, and to let it grow within one’s own mind," writes Senior Writer Gabriel Robare, encouraging readers to consider the long-term merits of taking the time to memorize a personal mantra — poetry, or otherwise.

THE PROSPECT | August 31

Courtesy of Nathan Davis

Princeton faculty member Nathan Davis wins Windham-Campbell Prize for Drama

This past spring, Professor Nathan Davis won the prestigious Donald Windham Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prize for Drama, receiving an unrestricted grant of $165,000.

This past spring, Professor Nathan Davis won the prestigious Donald Windham Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prize for Drama, receiving an unrestricted grant of $165,000.

THE PROSPECT | May 6

Ashley Chung / The Daily Princetonian

USG Movie Review: ‘Train to Busan’ (2016)

For fans of “Snowpiercer” and “World War Z,” Yeon Sang-ho’s “Train to Busan,” should be next on your watch list. The movie’s plot is set into motion when an unknown virus spreads across South Korea and causes a zombie apocalypse. 

For fans of “Snowpiercer” and “World War Z,” Yeon Sang-ho’s “Train to Busan,” should be next on your watch list. The movie’s plot is set into motion when an unknown virus spreads across South Korea and causes a zombie apocalypse. 

THE PROSPECT | May 6

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Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

AAS professor Imani Perry on bridging creative and academic writing

Imani Perry is a Professor of African American Studies. She is affiliated with several departments and programs including the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Law and Public Affairs, and the University Center for Human Values. Free copies of her book “Breathe: A Letter to my Sons” were distributed in Summer 2020 to undergraduates who opted in as part of USG’s anti-racism book initiative. 

Imani Perry is a Professor of African American Studies. She is affiliated with several departments and programs including the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Law and Public Affairs, and the University Center for Human Values. Free copies of her book “Breathe: A Letter to my Sons” were distributed in Summer 2020 to undergraduates who opted in as part of USG’s anti-racism book initiative. 

THE PROSPECT | April 4

Sandy Yang / The Daily Princetonian

Book-ish reviews "The Footnote" by Anthony Grafton

Anthony Grafton’s book, “The Footnote”, digs into the history of citation. I sat down with him to talk about his book, how history is made, how we understand the past, and the nature of truth. The humble little footnote is behind it all. Listen in. 

Anthony Grafton’s book, “The Footnote”, digs into the history of citation. I sat down with him to talk about his book, how history is made, how we understand the past, and the nature of truth. The humble little footnote is behind it all. Listen in.  

PODCAST | April 3

“Detail from La ciudad hidroespacial (The Hydrospatial City) by Gyula Kosice (b. 1924)“ by Steve Snodgrass / CC BY 2.0

The Power of the insurgent archive in Latinx art

Mari Carmen Ramírez and Yasmin Ramírez discuss the transformative role of archives in the preservation of Latinx art, culture, and authenticity in America in an event hosted by the Art and Archaeology Department at Princeton.

Mari Carmen Ramírez and Yasmin Ramírez discuss the transformative role of archives in the preservation of Latinx art, culture, and authenticity in America in an event hosted by the Art and Archaeology Department at Princeton.

THE PROSPECT | April 1

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

LCA professor Tracy K. Smith on race and American identity in poetry

Watching the world unfold over the past year, Tracy K. Smith, professor and director of the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in creative writing, has considered the ways she can encourage open and honest conversation surrounding issues at the forefront of our communities.

Watching the world unfold over the past year, Tracy K. Smith, Professor in the Creative Writing Program and Chair of The Lewis Center for the Arts, has considered the ways she can encourage open and honest conversation surrounding issues that are at the forefront of our communities.

THE PROSPECT | April 1

Akaneh Wang and Tri Giao Vu Dinh / The Daily Princetonian

How live music, art, and dance are combating vaccine hesitancy

Public health officials have employed some creative endeavors — from musically-charged cathedrals to music videos featuring local dancers — to encourage COVID-19 vaccination.

Public health officials have employed some creative endeavors — from musically-charged cathedrals to music videos featuring local dancers — to encourage COVID-19 vaccination. 

THE PROSPECT | March 24

Hazel Flaherty / The Daily Princetonian 

Synchronized heartbeats: A cappella groups fight to stay connected on the virtual stage

Since March 2020, a cappella, like so many other pillars of campus life and tradition, has migrated to the virtual realm. Group members discussed their plans for the spring semester, singing virtually in the fall, and what they've learned the past year.  

Since March 2020, a cappella, like so many other pillars of campus life and tradition, has migrated to the virtual realm. Group members discussed their plans for the spring semester, singing virtually in the fall, and what they've learned the past year.  

FEATURES | March 23

Courtesy of McCarter Theatre Center

The Manic Monologues: A space for mental health conversations in times of distress

Created by Zack Burton, a Stanford geology Ph.D. student, and Elisa Hofmeister, a medical student at the University of Minnesota, “The Manic Monologues” is a digital theatrical experience that aims to disrupt stigma around mental illness. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the play was hosted virtually by McCarter Theatre and premiered on Feb. 18. The interactive website features vignettes of people who have experienced mental illness in their lives. 

Created by Zack Burton, a Stanford geology Ph.D. student, and Elisa Hofmeister, a medical student at the University of Minnesota, “The Manic Monologues” is a digital theatrical experience that aims to disrupt stigma around mental illness. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the play was hosted virtually by McCarter Theatre and premiered on Feb. 18. The interactive website features vignettes of people who have experienced mental illness in their lives. 

THE PROSPECT | March 22

Illustration by Sandy Yang/The Daily Princetonian

Book-ish reviews "How to Live " by Sarah Bakewell

Innumerable writers since the 1580s have been influenced by Montaigne and saw themselves in his Essays, as Sarah Bakewell writes in her biography of him, How to Live. Ever since the book came out, Montaigne has been an extremely relatable figure in contemporary society. After having read Montaigne, Stefan Zweig said “Here is a ‘you’ in which my ‘I’ is reflected; here is where all distance is abolished.” More simply — Bernard Levin said “How did he know all that about me?” In this next episode of Book-ish, I’ll tell you how.

Innumerable writers since the 1580s have been influenced by Montaigne and saw themselves in his Essays, as Sarah Bakewell writes in her biography of him, How to Live. Ever since the book came out, Montaigne has been an extremely relatable figure in contemporary society. After having read Montaigne, Stefan Zweig said “Here is a ‘you’ in which my ‘I’ is reflected; here is where all distance is abolished.” More simply — Bernard Levin said “How did he know all that about me?” In this next episode of Book-ish, I’ll tell you how.

PODCAST | March 20

“Closed/Locked.”Courtesy of Antoni Muntadas

Antoni Muntadas speaks on fear in the 21st century for the Program in Media and Modernity

In his virtual talk on Feb. 23 for the Program in Media and Modernity, Muntadas spoke about how fear manifests in the media and the built environment. His presentation covered several of his works, each of which seeks to elucidate our relationship with fear. 

In his virtual talk on Feb. 23 for the Program in Media and Modernity, Muntadas spoke about how fear manifests in the media and the built environment. His presentation covered several of his works, each of which seeks to elucidate our relationship with fear. 

THE PROSPECT | March 17

Book-ish reviews "American Primitive" by Mary Oliver

Today I come to you with a ballad, a song of seasons passing, of nature, and of our place in it, to warm you when Princeton’s climate surely won’t. I’ll tell you about Mary Oliver and American Primitive, her Pulitzer Prize-winning book of poems. And together we will learn what it is to live in nature. 

Today I come to you with a ballad, a song of seasons passing, of nature, and of our place in it, to warm you when Princeton’s climate surely won’t. I’ll tell you about Mary Oliver and American Primitive, her Pulitzer Prize-winning book of poems. And together we will learn what it is to live in nature.

PODCAST | March 6

Payton Croskey / The Daily Princetonian

The beautiful mosaic of Black art and music: Prospect recommendations

In honor of Black History Month, Prospect writers share their favorite works of literature, music, and art created by Black artists, from Nikki Giovanni to Kanye West.

In honor of Black History Month, Prospect writers share their favorite works of literature, music, and art created by Black artists, from Nikki Giovanni to Kanye West.

THE PROSPECT | March 3

Paul McCartney performs.
 “Paul McCartney.jpg” by Jerzy Bednarski / CC BY-SA 4.0

“Who wants to present first?”: Sir Paul McCartney pays surprise visit to songwriting class

Sir Paul McCartney paid a visit to Professor Paul Muldoon’s ATL496 class, titled “How To Write A Song.” Joining under the name ‘Test Student,’ McCartney offered thorough feedback on each student’s work, often incorporating anecdotes from his time as a Beatle.

Sir Paul McCartney paid a visit to professor Paul Muldoon’s ATL496 class, titled “How To Write A Song.” Joining under the name “Test Student,“ McCartney offered thorough feedback on each student’s work, often incorporating anecdotes from his time as a Beatle. 

NEWS | February 23

Book-ish reviews "A Mathematician's Apology" by G.H. Hardy

G. H. Hardy, one of the most prominent mathematicians of the twentieth century, would agree with you: math is useless. You’ll never need it. And yet: Hardy still thinks math is worth your while. Why? Listen in to our newest episode of Book-ish to find out. 

G. H. Hardy, one of the most prominent mathematicians of the twentieth century, would agree with you: math is useless. You’ll never need it. And yet: Hardy still thinks math is worth your while. Why? Listen in to our newest episode of Book-ish to find out. 

PODCAST | February 20