Saturday, November 27

Previous Issues

Listen to Daybreak for the day’s biggest stories
Try our latest crossword

What happened in Texas? Prof. Jesse Jenkins explains

<h6>"High-tension power transmission towers at twilight in North Texas" by David R. Tribble with an added Daybreak logo / <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PylonsSunset-5982.jpg" target="_self">CC-SA 3.0</a></h6>
"High-tension power transmission towers at twilight in North Texas" by David R. Tribble with an added Daybreak logo / CC-SA 3.0

For the past seven days, a winter storm has rocked the state of Texas. Millions of people spent days without power as the unanticipated cold snap brought deadly outages to the state’s electrical grid. But why Texas? What made this winter storm so catastrophic for them, while the rest of the country largely persisted? And what can states do to protect against these disasters in the future? Today, we talk through these questions and more with Jesse Jenkins, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment whose research focuses on macro-scale energy systems and the electricity sector. 

ADVERTISEMENT


For more ‘Prince’ podcast episodes, including episodes of The Orange Table and Princeton Insights: The Highlights, visit this link. Be sure to subscribe to Daybreak on Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Apple Podcasts, so you can stay up-to-date.  

ADVERTISEMENT

Comments