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Special

Cadet Eliza Ewing ’20.
Photo Credit: Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

‘Preparing for the battlefield’: Athletics and leadership in ROTC

They woke up as first-years and seniors, history majors and engineers, Oklahomans and Connecticut natives. They pulled on standard-issue shirts, shorts, socks, strapped on their running watches. Some of them double-checked to make sure their shaves were clean. And somewhere in the walk from each of their dorms to Jadwin Gym, that group of individual students became something else entirely: a platoon of Army cadets. 

FEATURES | November 15

John K. Hurley '86.

Courtesy of Stanford Business School.

Legacies of Service: John Hurley ’86 and George Hurley ’22

Ret. Captain John Hurley graduated from the University in 1986 as an ROTC Cadet, Chairman of The Daily Princetonian, and with a degree in history. He went on to serve as an artillery officer in South Korea and fought in the first Gulf War. After his army service, Hurley went to Stanford Business School. Today, Hurley runs Cavalry Asset Management, an investment firm based in San Francisco and Hong Kong. His son, Cadet Sergeant George Hurley, is a sophomore at the University. Also enrolled in the ROTC program, George intends to follow his father in pursuing a degree in history.

NEWS | November 15

Jeongmin Cho ‘21 served in the South Korean military prior to his time at the University. 
Photo courtesy of Jeongmin Cho ‘21

In the service of other nations: International student vets at the U.

According to a report by the Davis Center, 12.4 percent of all undergraduates in the previous academic year and 25.3 percent of all University students were international students. The Daily Princetonian spoke with four international student veterans from South Korea and Israel about their experiences in service and transitions to the University. 

NEWS | November 14

Photo Credit: Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Toward inclusive, international scholarship

Fifty years ago, the Association of Black Collegians occupied New South to protest the University’s investments in apartheid South Africa. Those students examined South African history and contemporary affairs beyond the constraints of traditional Western scholarship. They pursued an expansive, provocative understanding of the human experience, one that transcended geographic and racial boundaries. We should heed their example.

OPINION | 03/08/2019

Source: Charlotte Adamo / The Daily Princetonian

A walk past Nassau: the historically black Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood

Beyond FitzRandolph Gate, the hustle and bustle of Nassau Street — full of trendy restaurants, University apparel shops, and retail chains — serve as the facade of the town, the first image that tourists, visitors, and University students encounter upon leaving campus grounds. But unbeknownst to many non-residents, past Nassau lies a history of segregation and an ongoing struggle to preserve the culture of the town’s historically African-American Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, whose first inhabitants settled in the 1680s.

NEWS | 03/08/2019

 Protesters after the sit-in in the President's office. Courtesy of Joanna Anyanwu '15 GS.

Alumni speak on the Black Justice League’s fight against the University’s racist legacies

At the forefront of calls for a name change to the Wilson School was the Black Justice League (BJL), a student activist organization that coordinated one of the biggest protests in Princeton history — a demonstration on the steps of Nassau Hall in 2015 followed by a 33-hour sit-in.

NEWS | 03/08/2019

Sameer Khan / Fotobuddy LLC

AAS department grows rapidly, adds more interdisciplinary courses

With its first cohort of concentrators graduating in June 2018, the African American Studies (AAS) Department is looking to continue its work in education and research. In the past seven years, the department has hired a large number of faculty, growing rapidly to the six fully-appointed and eight jointly-appointed faculty members they have today. The new hires shaped the team, adding their own unique insights, backgrounds, and visions.  Currently, the AAS department is focused on its academic offerings, developing its curricula and opening courses to a broader swath of the University community. Upcoming classes will continue to cut across traditional disciplines, attracting students in many departments.  

NEWS | 03/07/2019

A sign on the doors to New South reads “This bldg has been liberated by ABC.” Source: The Daily Princetonian Larry Dupraz Digital Archives.

Liberating New South: How black student activists inspired change through protest

At 7 a.m. on March 11, 1969, four students lurked in the weeds in front of the New South Building. Shortly afterwards, over 40 black students from the Association of Black Collegians (ABC) rushed the building, according to a log from the Department of Public Information. The students then chained the north doors of the building shut and secured the east doors with a mop.

NEWS | 03/07/2019