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The Prospect

Harsimran Makkad /  The Daily Princetonian

COVID-19 and ‘code red’: understanding the pandemic’s toll on frontline health care workers

Rather than watching the case count on The New York Times or other news outlets, I track the number of cases by the times we are what my family calls “code red,” when we handle clothing with gloves and disinfectant and maintain distance until my mother, an anesthesiologist, has showered.

THE PROSPECT | November 18

A screenshot of a Humanities Sequence precept.
Gabe Robare / The Daily Princetonian

‘How to be Human’: The Humanities Sequence in quarantine

This summer, HUM professors and students expressed their desire to see the course engage more fully with the current moment; as the first semester nears its close, The Daily Princetonian looked into what’s been done so far. Three HUM professors told the ‘Prince’ how they planned for this remarkable semester to replicate the class, to build the community, and to react to the moment. Two current students grade them on their success. All considered what it means to be human and what the humanities still has to teach us, even — perhaps especially — in a moment of crisis. 

THE PROSPECT | November 16

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Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

Texting home

Before leaving home, my phone history with my parents was sparse, to say the least. Now that I’m thousands of miles away, of course I’m texting my parents more. But as a high schooler, I would never have guessed just how often I would find myself, in college, reaching for the phone to contact my mom. 

THE PROSPECT | November 12

Sentient satellites? Futuristic football? Jon Bois’s longform speculative fictions “17776” and “20020” push the boundaries of imagination while reflecting on familiar questions.
Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

The surprising poignancy of futuristic football: Jon Bois’ ‘17776’ and ‘20020’

What will football look like in the future? Jon Bois explores this question and much more in his long-form multimedia speculative fiction narratives “17776” and “20020.” Staff writer Molly Cutler ’23 reviews these works and reflects on their surprising power, even for those who aren’t sports enthusiasts.

THE PROSPECT | November 11

Harsimran Makkad / The Daily Princetonian

Anti-racist Reading Reflection | When racism endangers Black bodies: How racism in healthcare puts Black communities at risk

The realms of medicine, white coats, and hospitals have been, and continue to be, deeply stained by racialized practices. In a society infiltrated by racism and inequity in almost every institution and profession, doctors and scientists have not been left behind; in fact, racism is rooted at the heart of medicine, pulsating, pounding, and remaining alive no matter whom it hurts.

THE PROSPECT | November 3

Katie Rohrbaugh / The Daily Princetonian

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is not the stress reliever I thought it would be

When Animal Crossing: New Horizons came out this past March, I thought the game would be a perfect counterbalance to the stresses of a wildly uncertain year. I cannot stress this enough: I absolutely love this game. But instead of becoming an outlet for my stress, I found that the New Horizons allowed me to repackage it under the facade of playing a video game. 

THE PROSPECT | November 2

John Ehling / The Daily Princetonian

Reflections from a first-year: Establishing friendships over Zoom

In a normal semester, students may have been able to sow the first seeds of a budding friendship by turning to a peer in an orientation hall or large lecture class to exchange a few words. Now, side conversations have become relegated to the Zoom chat, where a quick private message about an assignment might just spark the beginnings of a new connection.

THE PROSPECT | November 1