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The Prospect

“Peter Singer no Fronteiras do Pensamento Porto Alegre” by Fronteiras do Pensamento / CC BY-SA 2.0

Reading Peter Singer's ‘Famine, Affluence, and Morality’ 50 years later

“Famine, Affluence, and Morality” confronts the reader with their own complacency regarding global suffering, and the passage of time has not led to a heartening perspective. Half a century later, the world is in the midst of a refugee crisis, wars and famines continue to afflict millions, and society is still rife with poverty and inequality.  A modern frame of reference provides a new understanding of what may be necessary to goad the world into action, but we’ll start by reexamining Singer’s reasoning regarding the affluents’ duty to help those in need. 

“Famine, Affluence, and Morality” confronts the reader with their own complacency regarding global suffering, and the passage of time has not led to a heartening perspective. Half a century later, the world is in the midst of a refugee crisis, wars and famines continue to afflict millions, and society is still rife with poverty and inequality.  A modern frame of reference provides a new understanding of what may be necessary to goad the world into action, but we’ll start by reexamining Singer’s reasoning regarding the affluents’ duty to help those in need.  

THE PROSPECT | February 18

A collection of books speaking
Sierra Stern / The Daily Princetonian

Diving into contemporary poetry: 5 recommendations

Once unsatisfied by previous encounters with poetry from bygone eras, Prospect contributing writer Jeffrey Liao recommends five collections by contemporary poets for anyone looking to venture into the realm of poetry.

Once unsatisfied by previous encounters with poetry from bygone eras, Prospect contributing writer Jeffrey Liao recommends five collections by contemporary poets for anyone looking to venture into the realm of poetry.

THE PROSPECT | February 17

Topaz Winters aka Priyanka Aiyer ’23
Courtesy of Jared Ho

Topaz Winters, student and artist, makes meaning out of suffering

Topaz Winters, also known as Priyanka Aiyer ’23, is an internationally-acclaimed artist. The Prospect senior writer Paige Allen sat down to talk with Winters about her early start as a poet in Singapore, her life at the University, and her relationship with writing poetry as an act of creation and necessity.

Topaz Winters, also known as Priyanka Aiyer ’23, is an internationally-acclaimed artist. The Prospect senior writer Paige Allen sat down to talk with Winters about her early start as a poet in Singapore, her life at the University, and her relationship with writing poetry as an act of creation and necessity.

THE PROSPECT | February 16

Ashley Chung / The Daily Princetonian

A memoir of the personal and the political: Obama’s fight for the ACA

Facing a divided political landscape, Obama traces his political battle towards a more unified and accessible healthcare system for Americans regardless of income, class, gender, age, or race — an issue that lies close to his personal life.  

Facing a divided political landscape, Obama traces his political battle towards a more unified and accessible healthcare system for Americans regardless of income, class, gender, age, or race — an issue that lies close to his personal life.  

THE PROSPECT | February 15

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One dinner in arrival quarantine — Indian Butter Chicken.
Jack Allen / The Daily Princetonian

For COVID-19-safe food, Campus Dining undergoes a shift

The return of over 2,000 students this spring has posed a tough task for Campus Dining, as dining halls had to be de-densified and service pared back to quickly process students through serveries. Senior writer Jack Allen speaks to Smitha Haneef, Assistant Vice President for University Services — as well as a few students — about how the University has handled the challenge. 

The return of over 2,000 students this spring has posed a tough task for Campus Dining, as dining halls had to be de-densified and service pared back to quickly process students through serveries. Senior writer Jack Allen speaks to Smitha Haneef, Assistant Vice President for University Services — as well as a few students — about how the University has handled the challenge.

THE PROSPECT | February 14

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

Can this algorithm help Princeton students find love?

Last month, The Marriage Pact survey promised to find students “their optimal marital back-up plans” through a mathematical algorithm. Today, on Valentine’s Day, we take a look at how the social experiment fared at Princeton.

Last month, The Marriage Pact survey promised to find students “their optimal marital back-up plans” through a mathematical algorithm. Today, on Valentine’s Day, we take a look at how the social experiment fared at Princeton.

PODCAST | February 14

Payton Croskey / The Daily Princetonian

The importance of humanity in 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

Complete with gorgeous cinematography and stellar performances, King expertly crafts the film narrative in a way that is extremely relevant to contemporary conversation, while stressing the importance of humanization. In a roundtable discussion with college journalists, the main actors of “Judas” each shared their experiences working on the film and why they believe it’s important to view the film now. 

THE PROSPECT | February 10

Sandy Yang / The Daily Princetonian

Introducing Book-ish: A Prospect podcast

“In the summer before my senior year of high school, I read my first Jane Austen novel, Emma. And I hated it. But this past winter, I read it again, wanting to give it another chance. And I loved it. In this episode, I’ll tell you why.”

“In the summer before my senior year of high school, I read my first Jane Austen novel, Emma. And I hated it. But this past winter, I read it again, wanting to give it another chance. And I loved it. In this episode, I’ll tell you why.”

PODCAST | February 6

Cover art courtesy of Janielle Dumapit

Q&A with Janielle Dumapit ’23 on her EP and inspiration behind it

Janielle Dumapit ’23 released her extended play (EP), “Rose Colored Glasses,” on Jan. 30. Dumapit, a concentrator in the School of Public and International Affairs, wrote, performed, produced, and distributed the EP by herself. The Daily Princetonian sat down with her to discuss her songwriting process and the EP release.

Janielle Dumapit ’23 released her extended play (EP), “Rose Colored Glasses,” on Jan. 30. Dumapit, a concentrator in the School of Public and International Affairs, wrote, performed, produced, and distributed the EP by herself. The Daily Princetonian sat down with her to discuss her songwriting process and the EP release. 

THE PROSPECT | January 31

Courtesy of Catherine Watkins

Mythology meets modernity in senior thesis performance of ‘Unbecoming’

Paige Elizabeth Allen ’21 and Eliana Cohen-Orth ’21 take on “Unbecoming” — a play written by Emma Watkins ’18 — for their senior theses. With its performance taking place completely outdoors, “Unbecoming” follows the story of Lady Charlotte Guest, a real figure from the 1800s, as she works to translate the collection of Welsh tales known as the “Mabinogian.”

Paige Elizabeth Allen ’21 and Eliana Cohen-Orth ’21 take on “Unbecoming” — a play written by Emma Watkins ’18 — for their senior theses. With its performance taking place completely outdoors, “Unbecoming” follows the story of Lady Charlotte Guest, a real figure from the 1800s, as she works to translate the collection of Welsh tales known as the “Mabinogian.”

THE PROSPECT | January 26

Mikaela Avakian / The Daily Princetonian

Five ways to take care of yourself in 2021

2020 was a physically and emotionally taxing year for many of us. The importance of finding outlets to keep us sane and relaxed as the world seemingly explodes cannot be overstated. In the sixth installment of our recommendations series, staff members of The Prospect share various self care activities they have adopted — not only to survive but to thrive — in quarantine. Here are some ways to take care of yourself in 2021.

2020 was a physically and emotionally taxing year for many of us. The importance of finding outlets to keep us sane and relaxed as the world seemingly explodes cannot be overstated. In the sixth installment of our recommendations series, staff members of The Prospect share various self care activities they have adopted — not only to survive but to thrive — in quarantine. Here are some ways to take care of yourself in 2021.

THE PROSPECT | January 21

José Pablo Fernandez García / The Daily Princetonian

For all the grieving tigers

Every time this happens, every time I feel my eyes begin to swell up or my throat tighten a bit as I learn how many more thousands have died in this country alone, I wonder just how many people are setting out on this tragic journey I began about eight years ago.

Every time this happens, every time I feel my eyes begin to swell up or my throat tighten a bit as I learn how many more thousands have died in this country alone, I wonder just how many people are setting out on this tragic journey I began about eight years ago.

THE PROSPECT | January 12

Courtesy of the Princeton Tigertones

Tigertones spread holiday cheer in Good Morning America performance

Performing on the popular morning talk show Good Morning America, the Tones were broadcast into the homes of millions of Americans on Christmas morning around 7:30 a.m. EST. 

Performing on the popular morning talk show Good Morning America, the Tones were broadcast into the homes of millions of Americans on Christmas morning around 7:30 a.m. EST. 

THE PROSPECT | January 11

Shavo Odadjian (left) and Serj Tankian (right) during  Sydney Soundwave 2012. 
Kieran Krud / Creative Commons 

Cultural resilience amidst diasporic fragmentation in the music of System of A Down

Officially formed in 1994, System of a Down is an Armenian-American heavy metal band founded in Yerevan’s (unofficial) twin-city capital of Glendale, California. With their international success, the group has bolstered a distinct Armenian musical heritage that has seeped into the ears of billions of foreign fans worldwide.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

The Three Trees, 1643
Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606–1669
Etching with drypoint and engraving
plate: 21 × 28 cm (8 1/4 × 11 in.) sheet: 21.3 × 28.5 cm (8 3/8 × 11 1/4 in.)
Princeton University Art Museum. Museum purchase, Fowler McCormick, Class of 1921, Fund and Laura P. Hall Memorial Fund in memory of the Museum’s dear friend and benefactor David A. Tierno

Drawings, deals, and diversification: A look into the life and experience of a Princeton curator

Staff Writer Baylee Cox reflects on a Princeton University Art Museum talk on Rembrandt’s The Three Trees and speaks to curator Laura Giles about diversifying the museum’s collections.

Staff Writer Baylee Cox reflects on a Princeton University Art Museum talk on Rembrandt’s The Three Trees and speaks to curator Laura Giles about diversifying the museum’s collections.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

Mel Hornyak / Theatre Intime

Theatre Intime’s ‘As You Like It’ is a jubilant and witty rom-com for the pandemic

Theatre Intime and the Princeton Shakespeare Company’s decision to remotely produce “As You Like It,” Shakespeare’s lighthearted pastoral comedy, strikes a pleasantly discordant note in a year defined by a global pandemic that demonstrates no signs of waning in many parts of the world, accelerating political polarization, and many sacrifices, big and small. Senior Prospect writer Amy Ciceu reviews this new radio play.

Theatre Intime and the Princeton Shakespeare Company’s decision to remotely produce “As You Like It,” Shakespeare’s lighthearted pastoral comedy, strikes a pleasantly discordant note in a year defined by a global pandemic that demonstrates no signs of waning in many parts of the world, accelerating political polarization, and many sacrifices, big and small. Senior Prospect writer Amy Ciceu reviews this new radio play.

THE PROSPECT | December 20