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The Daily Princetonian

Students optimistic about potential sign language course

With a helping hand from the USG and several professors, students who proposed that the University introduce a sign language course hope to see their idea become reality as early as next spring."We've been working on it kind of throughout the year," said U-Councilor Melissa Briggs '02, who has spearheaded the effort since it began last semester.Much of the work Briggs has done to bring the project to fruition involves finding a department to host the would-be class.

NEWS | 04/19/2000

The Daily Princetonian

An aspiring journalist tackles his most personal assignment

When I visited my grandfather in a St. Louis hospital in May of last year, I arrived at his bedside having received instructions from him to bring three things: a pen, a notebook and an envelope from Bopp Chapel, the local funeral home.The instructions came without emotion ? even matter-of-factly ? reflecting a characteristic stoicism that runs in certain parts of the family.

NEWS | 04/19/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Students leave ivory tower through the Community-Based Learning Initiative Learning Initiative

The Community-Based Learning Initiative forges connections between the University and the community, expanding students' coursework beyond the boundaries of the classroom.Approximately 50 University students, faculty members and community leaders gathered Friday at the Clay Street Learning Center for the second annual Community-University Luncheon to celebrate the successes of the CBLI.The CBLI is a collaborative effort among students, faculty, administrators and community members that works to provide University students with opportunities for community involvement and hands-on research.Writing professor Kathryn Watterson incorporated the CBLI into a class she taught this semester ? WRI 155w: The Writer in the Community.

NEWS | 04/18/2000

The Daily Princetonian

At Hayden Planetarium, Tyson opens a window to the universe

NEW YORK ? On a small conference room floor littered with pictures of galaxies and office chairs with price tags still attached, a small group of University freshmen sat captivated by Neil de Grasse Tyson, the recently appointed director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York.Amid his passionate criticisms about the inaccurate night sky in "Titanic" and the mathematically false presentation of the Drake Equation in "Contact," Tyson ? who doubles as a University astrophysics professor ? described the newly renovated $210-million Rose Center and the state-of-the-art Hayden Planetarium."Dr. Tyson was amazing," said Karen Mendelson '03, a member of the freshman seminar that visited the planetarium last week.

NEWS | 04/18/2000

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The Daily Princetonian

Opening a school, and unlocking doors

Thirteen-year-old Nuwoe sat in a small classroom, his bright eyes intently focused on the assignment before him."Vivacious," he said haltingly, struggling to pronounce one of 10 words on his vocabulary list."Can you think of someone who is vivacious?" Nuwoe was asked."If it's one person, it's gotta be Mr. Dixon," the eighth-grader replied with an enthusiastic smile.

NEWS | 04/17/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Joining the fight against the IMF

Several University students joined thousands of demonstrators from across the country in Washington, D.C., this weekend, to protest world financial meetings in the nation's capital.Most of the students went with the Democratic Left, a campus group devoted to working for liberal causes.

NEWS | 04/17/2000

The Daily Princetonian

University invests in economist Krugman

The invisible hand recently guided a pivotal faculty acquisition for the University, bringing world-renowned economist Paul Krugman from the numbered halls of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to Princeton's Bendheim Hall.Though Krugman said the University administration has "signed and sealed" his appointment to the economics department that begins next fall, he was not sure which classes he will teach."I am expecting to teach some intro classes, but a lot of it is really teaching classes they need me to fill," he said yesterday.Krugman said in the semesters to come he hopes to continue teaching the same broad range of classes he offered at MIT ? from graduate seminars in the field of international trade to introductory undergraduate courses such as ECO 101.Since 1992, Krugman's name has gained familiarity among people outside his field, partly because of his prominence as a candidate for top economic-advising slots in the Clinton administration.

NEWS | 04/17/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Board narrows list of possible sites for sixth residential college

The trustees have ruled out the Graduate College and Poe Field as possible locations for the sixth residential college proposed in the Wythes Committee Report, University Trustee Paul Wythes '55 said yesterday.The University hired an architectural planning firm to evaluate possible locations for the sixth college after the Wythes report was made public in January.

NEWS | 04/16/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Theses from Afar

A dozen books, a stack of photocopies, a Firestone carrel and several months of toil ? does this a thesis make?Absolutely not say more than 100 students each year.

NEWS | 04/16/2000

The Daily Princetonian

After three years of consideration, trustees approve Wythes plan

In a landmark vote Saturday, the University Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Wythes committee's recommendation to increase the size of the undergraduate student body by 500 students ? finalizing a decision that prompted almost three years of deliberation and elicited considerable campus debate.The increase will be phased in over four years, beginning in 2003 or 2004, once the necessary facilities and living spaces have been constructed, committee chair Paul Wythes '55 said."[The trustees] were very receptive," Wythes said of his committee's proposal.

NEWS | 04/16/2000

The Daily Princetonian

A festival of faces: Communiversity weaves together cultures with family fun

Flags waving, skirts of elementary school folk dancers swishing and children with tigers painted on their faces laughing created a collage of music and color that shone brighter and sounded louder than the soft thud of rain drops falling from a grey sky."If Gene Kelly can sing and dance in the rain, we can do it here on Nassau," said Princeton Township Mayor Phyllis Marchand during her welcoming speech at Communiver-sity on Saturday, before leading the crowd in a verse of the high-spirited tune.Despite the rain, which forced the Arts Council's Art Park ? a series of arts and crafts stations for children ? inside the council's building on Witherspoon Street and deterred certain groups from performing, hundreds of people came out to celebrate town-gown unity."[The rain] hasn't seemed to dampen the spirits of the crowd," Arts Council of Princeton Executive Director Anne Reeves said.

NEWS | 04/16/2000