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A white, marble building with columns and a brown door.

N.J. College Dems caught in controversy over endorsement of Kim for U.S. Senate

In a series of calls, a Rutgers junior in contact with Tammy Murphy’s Senate campaign pressured the College Democrats of New Jersey and the three Princeton students who serve as some of their officers not to endorse her chief rival in the race, Andy Kim. Murphy personally called Nate Howard ’25 to apologize and said that the caller did not speak on behalf of the campaign.

In a series of calls, a Rutgers junior in contact with Tammy Murphy’s Senate campaign pressured the College Democrats of New Jersey and the three Princeton students who serve as some of their officers not to endorse her chief rival in the race, Andy Kim. Murphy personally called Nate Howard ’25 to apologize and said that the caller did not speak on behalf of the campaign.

NEWS | January 17

A multicolored banner reading "Wintersession" hangs from a light pole on a snow-covered field.

Wintersession popularity soars with graduate students, free meals offered to participants

42 percent of graduate students have registered for at least one Wintersession offering this year, with enrollment expected to rise. Wintersession began this week and ends Jan. 28.

42 percent of graduate students have registered for at least one Wintersession offering this year, with enrollment expected to rise. Wintersession began this week and ends Jan. 28.

NEWS | January 17

colonial Candace Do DP.jpg

Colonial launches early sign-in ahead of anticipated largest Street Week ever

Colonial, one of five sign-in clubs, will allow new sophomore members to join early and eat meals at the club for the entire semester. This comes as sign-in clubs anticipate increased demand for the Class of 2026, the University’s largest graduating class ever.

Colonial, one of five sign-in clubs, will allow new sophomore members to join early and eat meals at the club for the entire semester. This comes as sign-in clubs anticipate increased demand for the Class of 2026, the University’s largest graduating class ever.

NEWS | January 17

A brick building sits alongside a icy sidewalk. The building has windows in front and there are books in the windows. The sign above the windows reads "LABYRINTH BOOKS" just above a blue awning.

Labyrinth employees officially unionize after signing of recognition agreement

Employees and owners of Labyrinth Books signed an agreement with the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union following the owners’ voluntary recognition of the union. With coursebook season approaching, those involved did not express concern that unionization efforts will interfere with the effectiveness of the workers in doing their jobs.

Employees and owners of Labyrinth Books signed an agreement with the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union following the owners’ voluntary recognition of the union. With coursebook season approaching, those involved did not express concern that unionization efforts will interfere with the effectiveness of the workers in doing their jobs.

NEWS | January 16

Photo of a gothic stone tower above other stone buildings against a cloudy gray sky in a snowy field.

Graduate Student Government VP election highlights fight for graduate student parity

Graduate Student Government Executive Committee elections came to a close on Dec. 26. The Daily Princetonian talked to the VP candidates about the campaign points most important to graduate students, namely, equity with the undergraduate population and improved housing and health care security. 

Graduate Student Government Executive Committee elections came to a close on Dec. 26. The Daily Princetonian talked to the VP candidates about the campaign points most important to graduate students, namely, equity with the undergraduate population and improved housing and health care security. 

NEWS | January 10

Photo of a gothic stone tower above other stone buildings against a cloudy gray sky.

‘DEI is broken, and everyone knows it’: Differing interpretations of DEI complicate GSG elections

After heated exchanges by graduate students over Slack complicated the contested campaign for the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Officer position, the election closed with Caridad Estrada GS as winner. Mirroring nationwide discussions, the issue of how to interpret and implement DEI at institutions of higher learning was central to the election.

After heated exchanges by graduate students over Slack complicated the contested campaign for the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion officer position, the election closed with Caridad Estrada GS as winner. Mirroring nationwide discussions, the interpretation and implementation of DEI at institutions of higher learning were central to the election.

NEWS | January 10

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A storefront with "Labyrinth Books" printed across a blue awning. Books and strings of paper cranes are displayed in the windows.

Labyrinth owners announce intention to voluntarily recognize unionization of employees

On Jan. 9, the owners of Labyrinth Books announced their intention to voluntarily recognize the unionization of their staff in a press release. Once the agreement is officially signed, the bargaining process will officially begin.

On Jan. 9, the owners of Labyrinth Books announced their intention to voluntarily recognize the unionization of their staff in a press release. Once the agreement is officially signed, the bargaining process will officially begin.

NEWS | January 10

Image of Cloister Inn: a mansion-like house with brown and gray masonry, and a large entryway with an American flag flying above it.

Cloister Inn to stay afloat through spring semester

Cloister Inn's Graduate Board of Governors reported that the eating club had raised over $100,000 in two weeks in an “unprecedented show of support.” Their letter emphasized that while the club will have enough funds to operate for the spring semester, the long-term future of Cloister is still uncertain. 

Cloister Inn's Graduate Board of Governors reported that the eating club had raised over $100,000 in two weeks in an “unprecedented show of support.” Their letter emphasized that while the club will have enough funds to operate for the spring semester, the long-term future of Cloister is still uncertain. 

NEWS | January 10

Lucey Campus Club

Wintersession garners increasing demand as initiative enters fourth year

Wintersession, which is set to begin this year on Monday, Jan. 14, is offering more workshops than ever. Increased popularity has led to some issues with the registration website crashing and last minute course offerings to meet the record demand.

Wintersession, which is set to begin this year on Monday, Jan. 14, is offering more workshops than ever. Increased popularity has led to last-minute course offerings and some issues with the registration website crashing.

NEWS | January 10

A storefront with "Labyrinth Books" printed across a blue awning. Books and strings of paper cranes are displayed in the windows.

Workers at Labyrinth Books file unionization petition, likely to unionize

Labyrinth employees will likely vote on whether to unionize by the end of January. Should the unionization efforts succeed, store owners said they would "bargain in good faith for all of our employees and expect to reach a fair and acceptable contract."

Labyrinth employees will likely vote on whether to unionize by the end of January. Should the unionization efforts succeed, store owners said they would "bargain in good faith for all of our employees and expect to reach a fair and acceptable contract."

NEWS | January 3

A cannon with the words "F*ck Israel" painted on it

Eating clubs vandalized with pro-Palestine and anti-Israel graffiti

Two eating clubs and a brick wall on University property were vandalized with pro-Palestine and anti-Israel graffiti on Dec. 23 and 24. The graffiti is the first reported incident of vandalism at Princeton related to the conflict in Israel and Gaza.

Two eating clubs and a brick wall on University property were vandalized with pro-Palestine and anti-Israel graffiti on Dec. 23 and 24. The graffiti is the first reported incident of vandalism at Princeton related to the conflict in Israel and Gaza.

NEWS | December 28

A number of people hold up signs reading "Free Palestine Ceasefire Now" and "Ceasefire Now" holding Palestinian flags. A person holding an Israeli flag is visible in the background.

Students weigh impact of national focus on campus activism surrounding Israel and Palestine

After a semester of national focus on student views on the conflict in Israel and Gaza, student leaders weigh the impacts of the high-profile national coverage, which included an invitation to one student leader to participate in a CNN televised debate on the conflict and its impact on college campuses.

After a semester of national focus on student views on the conflict in Israel and Gaza, student leaders weigh the impacts of the high-profile national coverage, which included an invitation to one student leader to participate in a CNN televised debate on the conflict and its impact on college campuses.

NEWS | December 20

Five people — two women and three men — stand in front of a podium and flags, smiling for a photo.

An interview with Eisgruber and Governor Phil Murphy on a new AI hub

The Daily Princetonian spoke with University President Christopher Eisgruber ’83 and Governor Phil Murphy before the announcement of the establishment of a new artificial intelligence hub at Princeton University.

The Daily Princetonian spoke with University President Christopher Eisgruber ’83 and Governor Phil Murphy before the announcement of the establishment of a new artificial intelligence hub at Princeton University.

NEWS | December 20

The North Lawn entrance of the Frist Campus Center. Pictured are wooden double doors recessed into a decorative concrete entrance.

Princeton affirms commitment to DEI after information about several employees shared

“We have been in touch with those affected by this incident to offer [our] support,” Vice Provost for Institutional Equity and Diversity Michele Minter wrote in a statement to The Daily Princetonian.

“We are very concerned about the increasing use of doxing as a strategy to harass members of our community. We have been in touch with those affected by this incident to offer to support,” University spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss wrote in an email to The Daily Princetonian.

NEWS | December 19

scooter outside a brown door with leaves around it.

Princeton’s town council formalizes town ban on scooters amid safety concerns

During its meeting on Dec. 18, 2023, Princeton’s town council passed an ordinance formally prohibiting people from riding scooters on sidewalks in the “Central Business District.” This includes a stretch of Nassau Street from Bayard Lane to Maple Street, a stretch of Witherspoon Street from Nassau Street to Paul Robeson Place, and the Palmer Square area.

During its meeting on December 18, 2023 the Princeton town Council passed an ordinance formally prohibiting people from riding scooters on sidewalks in the “Central Business District.” This includes a stretch of Nassau Street from Bayard Lane to Maple Street, a stretch of Witherspoon Street from Nassau Street to Paul Robeson Place, and the Palmer Square area.

NEWS | December 19

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Friends and family remember Sophia Jones ’27, ‘incandescent spirit’ and accomplished ballerina

A prospective molecular biology major and a member of Yeh College, Jones was a lifelong dedicated and passionate ballerina who had a love for animals, teaching, and hoped to pursue pediatric medicine after graduating from Princeton.

A prospective molecular biology major and a member of Yeh College, Jones was a lifelong dedicated and passionate ballerina who had a love for animals, teaching, and hoped to pursue pediatric medicine after graduating from Princeton.

NEWS | December 19

A sign stating “Princeton University,” with “Undergraduate Admissions” written underneath

Early action decisions released, marking next phase of student body expansion

Princeton admitted students to the Class of 2028 on Dec. 14 as part of its Single-Choice Early Action round. Princeton's next class, admitted during a time of change for admissions offices across the country, will arrive on campus amidst significant changes to campus infrastructure as the student body continues to expand.

Princeton admitted students to the Class of 2028 on Dec. 14 as part of its Single-Choice Early Action round. Princeton's next class, admitted during a time of change for admissions offices across the country, will arrive on campus amidst significant changes to campus infrastructure as the student body continues to expand.

NEWS | December 18

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International students highlight challenges with flying home after finals period

All five of the students interviewed expressed that the final exam schedule should be released earlier, and two suggested the semester should finish a week earlier.

All five of the students interviewed expressed that the final exam schedule should be released earlier, and two suggested the semester should finish a week earlier.

NEWS | December 14

A street, lined with shops, cars, and evenly spaced trees, on a cloudy day.

Temporary parking banned on Witherspoon Street amid pedestrian transformation

Changes to parking and traffic density, two longtime concerns of Princeton residents, students, and professors, were addressed at the town council’s Dec. 11 meeting.

Changes to parking and traffic density, two longtime concerns of Princeton residents, students, and professors, were addressed at the town council’s Dec. 11 meeting.

NEWS | December 13