Tuesday, November 30

Previous Issues

Listen to Daybreak for the day’s biggest stories
Try our latest crossword

Arts

“Peter Singer no Fronteiras do Pensamento Porto Alegre” by Fronteiras do Pensamento / CC BY-SA 2.0

Reading Peter Singer's ‘Famine, Affluence, and Morality’ 50 years later

“Famine, Affluence, and Morality” confronts the reader with their own complacency regarding global suffering, and the passage of time has not led to a heartening perspective. Half a century later, the world is in the midst of a refugee crisis, wars and famines continue to afflict millions, and society is still rife with poverty and inequality.  A modern frame of reference provides a new understanding of what may be necessary to goad the world into action, but we’ll start by reexamining Singer’s reasoning regarding the affluents’ duty to help those in need. 

“Famine, Affluence, and Morality” confronts the reader with their own complacency regarding global suffering, and the passage of time has not led to a heartening perspective. Half a century later, the world is in the midst of a refugee crisis, wars and famines continue to afflict millions, and society is still rife with poverty and inequality.  A modern frame of reference provides a new understanding of what may be necessary to goad the world into action, but we’ll start by reexamining Singer’s reasoning regarding the affluents’ duty to help those in need.  

THE PROSPECT | February 18

A collection of books speaking
Sierra Stern / The Daily Princetonian

Diving into contemporary poetry: 5 recommendations

Once unsatisfied by previous encounters with poetry from bygone eras, Prospect contributing writer Jeffrey Liao recommends five collections by contemporary poets for anyone looking to venture into the realm of poetry.

Once unsatisfied by previous encounters with poetry from bygone eras, Prospect contributing writer Jeffrey Liao recommends five collections by contemporary poets for anyone looking to venture into the realm of poetry.

THE PROSPECT | February 17

Topaz Winters aka Priyanka Aiyer ’23
Courtesy of Jared Ho

Topaz Winters, student and artist, makes meaning out of suffering

Topaz Winters, also known as Priyanka Aiyer ’23, is an internationally-acclaimed artist. The Prospect senior writer Paige Allen sat down to talk with Winters about her early start as a poet in Singapore, her life at the University, and her relationship with writing poetry as an act of creation and necessity.

Topaz Winters, also known as Priyanka Aiyer ’23, is an internationally-acclaimed artist. The Prospect senior writer Paige Allen sat down to talk with Winters about her early start as a poet in Singapore, her life at the University, and her relationship with writing poetry as an act of creation and necessity.

THE PROSPECT | February 16

Sandy Yang / The Daily Princetonian

Introducing Book-ish: A Prospect podcast

“In the summer before my senior year of high school, I read my first Jane Austen novel, Emma. And I hated it. But this past winter, I read it again, wanting to give it another chance. And I loved it. In this episode, I’ll tell you why.”

“In the summer before my senior year of high school, I read my first Jane Austen novel, Emma. And I hated it. But this past winter, I read it again, wanting to give it another chance. And I loved it. In this episode, I’ll tell you why.”

PODCAST | February 6

Cover art courtesy of Janielle Dumapit

Q&A with Janielle Dumapit ’23 on her EP and inspiration behind it

Janielle Dumapit ’23 released her extended play (EP), “Rose Colored Glasses,” on Jan. 30. Dumapit, a concentrator in the School of Public and International Affairs, wrote, performed, produced, and distributed the EP by herself. The Daily Princetonian sat down with her to discuss her songwriting process and the EP release.

Janielle Dumapit ’23 released her extended play (EP), “Rose Colored Glasses,” on Jan. 30. Dumapit, a concentrator in the School of Public and International Affairs, wrote, performed, produced, and distributed the EP by herself. The Daily Princetonian sat down with her to discuss her songwriting process and the EP release. 

THE PROSPECT | January 31

Courtesy of Catherine Watkins

Mythology meets modernity in senior thesis performance of ‘Unbecoming’

Paige Elizabeth Allen ’21 and Eliana Cohen-Orth ’21 take on “Unbecoming” — a play written by Emma Watkins ’18 — for their senior theses. With its performance taking place completely outdoors, “Unbecoming” follows the story of Lady Charlotte Guest, a real figure from the 1800s, as she works to translate the collection of Welsh tales known as the “Mabinogian.”

Paige Elizabeth Allen ’21 and Eliana Cohen-Orth ’21 take on “Unbecoming” — a play written by Emma Watkins ’18 — for their senior theses. With its performance taking place completely outdoors, “Unbecoming” follows the story of Lady Charlotte Guest, a real figure from the 1800s, as she works to translate the collection of Welsh tales known as the “Mabinogian.”

THE PROSPECT | January 26

ADVERTISEMENT
Shavo Odadjian (left) and Serj Tankian (right) during  Sydney Soundwave 2012. 
Kieran Krud / Creative Commons 

Cultural resilience amidst diasporic fragmentation in the music of System of A Down

Officially formed in 1994, System of a Down is an Armenian-American heavy metal band founded in Yerevan’s (unofficial) twin-city capital of Glendale, California. With their international success, the group has bolstered a distinct Armenian musical heritage that has seeped into the ears of billions of foreign fans worldwide.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

The Three Trees, 1643
Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606–1669
Etching with drypoint and engraving
plate: 21 × 28 cm (8 1/4 × 11 in.) sheet: 21.3 × 28.5 cm (8 3/8 × 11 1/4 in.)
Princeton University Art Museum. Museum purchase, Fowler McCormick, Class of 1921, Fund and Laura P. Hall Memorial Fund in memory of the Museum’s dear friend and benefactor David A. Tierno

Drawings, deals, and diversification: A look into the life and experience of a Princeton curator

Staff Writer Baylee Cox reflects on a Princeton University Art Museum talk on Rembrandt’s The Three Trees and speaks to curator Laura Giles about diversifying the museum’s collections.

Staff Writer Baylee Cox reflects on a Princeton University Art Museum talk on Rembrandt’s The Three Trees and speaks to curator Laura Giles about diversifying the museum’s collections.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

Mel Hornyak / Theatre Intime

Theatre Intime’s ‘As You Like It’ is a jubilant and witty rom-com for the pandemic

Theatre Intime and the Princeton Shakespeare Company’s decision to remotely produce “As You Like It,” Shakespeare’s lighthearted pastoral comedy, strikes a pleasantly discordant note in a year defined by a global pandemic that demonstrates no signs of waning in many parts of the world, accelerating political polarization, and many sacrifices, big and small. Senior Prospect writer Amy Ciceu reviews this new radio play.

Theatre Intime and the Princeton Shakespeare Company’s decision to remotely produce “As You Like It,” Shakespeare’s lighthearted pastoral comedy, strikes a pleasantly discordant note in a year defined by a global pandemic that demonstrates no signs of waning in many parts of the world, accelerating political polarization, and many sacrifices, big and small. Senior Prospect writer Amy Ciceu reviews this new radio play.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

Jani Dumapit / Princeton University Players

Princeton University Players takes the virtual stage — and audience members' hearts — with Sex on Broadway

Directed by Sabina Jafri ’24, “Sex on Broadway 2020: Things We Missed” showcases new takes on classic Broadway show tunes and shares the Class of 2024’s unique journey from the onset of the pandemic to the beginning of the fall semester.

THE PROSPECT | December 20

Lawrence Lek, Sinofuturism (1839-2046 AD), 2016 [still] HD video, stereo sound / © Lawrence Lek, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Confronting ‘virtual’ dualities in the work of multimedia artist Lawrence Lek

On Nov. 5, multimedia artist Lawrence Lek gave a public talk hosted by the Princeton Art Museum to discuss the research interests and questions that guide his practice, focusing in particular on three films: “Sinofuturism (1839-2046 AD)“ (2016), “Geomancer” (2017), and “AIDOL” (2019). Lek is the 2020 Sarah Lee Elson International Artist-In-Residence.

THE PROSPECT | December 6

Courtesy of Jake Turney

Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason: Chamber music with intimacy

During a period in which a pandemic has restricted communication, both verbal and musical in nature, brother-sister cellist and pianist duo Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason performed a program of chamber works rich in interaction, comprised of works by Beethoven, Saint-Saëns, and Rachmaninoff, that spanned the widest possible breadth of the Romantic period. 

THE PROSPECT | December 6

Mel Hornyak / Theatre Intime

Theatre Intime’s ‘As You Like It: A Radio Play’ is a multifront victory for accessible theater

“As You Like It,” which premiered on Nov. 20, is the second PSC production I’ve seen — or, I should say, heard. Unlike previous PSC shows, this comedy took place virtually in the “radio play” format, named for the historic practice of theater works which are performed over radio broadcast.

THE PROSPECT | December 6

Harsimran Makkad / The Daily Princetonian

Anti-racist Reading Reflection | When racism endangers Black bodies: How racism in healthcare puts Black communities at risk

The realms of medicine, white coats, and hospitals have been, and continue to be, deeply stained by racialized practices. In a society infiltrated by racism and inequity in almost every institution and profession, doctors and scientists have not been left behind; in fact, racism is rooted at the heart of medicine, pulsating, pounding, and remaining alive no matter whom it hurts.

THE PROSPECT | 11/03/2020