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The Daily Princetonian

Professor refurbishes telescope to investigate stellar mysteries

Since 1971, the telescope in FitzRandolph Observatory has seen little use. The equipment simply gathered dust, used by only the occasional amateur stargazer.But beginning last summer, a team of University students and faculty headed up by physics professor David Wilkinson began a massive effort to change the dilapidated telescope into a state-of-the-art instrument that could help bring mankind one step closer to contact with extraterrestrial life.Wilkinson's project was prompted by an experiment coordinated by Harvard University professor Paul Horowitz to detect and catalog unexplained polarized light pulses observed in the night sky.Horowitz and Wilkinson had first met years before when Horowitz was still a graduate student at Harvard.

NEWS | 03/29/2000

The Daily Princetonian

For Princeton, A Money-Back Guarantee

John Little '80 was working on a project at the computer science building in the spring of 1977 when a 13-year-old boy took him across Olden Street to demonstrate the newest computer technology ? the Internet's predecessor, the Advanced Research Project Agency's Net, which is also known as the Arpanet.Dialing up on a primitive machine and using a simple modem, Little was amazed at their ability to access several government-run information resources.As soon as Little realized what he was seeing, he knew that the technology would some day change the world.

NEWS | 03/28/2000

The Daily Princetonian

'Bane of existence,' senior theses represent traditional rite of passage

For most seniors at colleges and universities across the country, spring is a time to savor the college experience before diving headfirst into the 'real world.' But for Princeton seniors, spring is marked by countless late nights in Firestone carrels as they struggle to polish their senior theses.Hyped up on coffee and Wa Bolis at 4 a.m.

NEWS | 03/28/2000

The Daily Princetonian

University shifts responsibility for discipline appeals process to deans

Students received a campus-wide e-mail Monday informing them of recent changes to Rights, Rules, Responsibilities that, beginning April 1, will affect the composition of the disciplinary committee and the process through which students can appeal its rulings.The present language of the process calls for students who are appealing committee decisions to take up their complaints with President Shapiro, who has the authority to decide to either uphold, lessen or increase the penalty.

NEWS | 03/28/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Ivy League administrators defend price-tag increases after Williams opts to freeze tuition

Despite recently announcing the smallest annual percent increases in tuition in three decades, Ivy League officials are finding themselves placed on the defensive about the costs of attending their institutions.Since Princeton announced a 3.3-percent tuition increase to $32,626 in late January, all of the Ivy schools except Columbia University have announced tuition and fee charges for the upcoming year.For each of the colleges, next year's rate of increase is the lowest in recent history.

NEWS | 03/28/2000

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The Daily Princetonian

Lack of Vision

When the USG launched its Visions of Princeton survey in February, USG president PJ Kim was a man in search of a vision on some of the most important issues his administration was facing.But even after extensive advertising and a decision to extend the survey period to more than 3 weeks, only about 600 students filled out the online poll ? leaving Kim, who had planned to use the survey to set his agenda, without clear goals or direction for his presidency."Our goal [for responses] was over 1,000," USG vice president Spence Miller '02 said.

NEWS | 03/28/2000

The Daily Princetonian

The Moral Mentor

Anders Chen '01 kept forgetting. He knew that people were starving somewhere around the world, that they lived without houses or clothes or doctors or books and that children died in swaths every day from malnutrition.He knew this.

NEWS | 03/27/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Internet pioneer amasses millions

While most of his classmates wrote LIT 141 papers, Jared Schutz '96 wrote business plans. And while classmates were busy learning how to find their classes, he was finding investors for his Chicago-based Internet service provider, which he co-founded and later sold for $23 million.Several companies and hundreds of million dollars later, Schutz ? the former 'Bluemountain.com wiz' ? is still busy, serving as chairman of three other Internet-based companies across the country.He will speak on the subject of the Internet economy in a speech today at the University.In an interview yesterday, Schutz dismissed his technological success as luck, saying that as investors' interest in the Internet grew, he was "fortunate to be in the right place at the right time."Schutz, who said he never took a computer science course while at the University, explained that he thinks of himself as "more of a business guy than an Internet guy."He recalled that he has always been interested in two things ? computers and politics.

NEWS | 03/27/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Sills '96 scores with ESPN column

Sometimes a simple e-mail is all it takes. For Jonathan Sills '96, author of ESPN.com's "Behind the Numbers" column, a little bit of initiative went a long way.Sills, an avid ESPN.com user while studying at Oxford University the year after his Princeton graduation, took a special interest in one ESPN column that blended science and sports."I just randomly wrote in one day and asked if they had any interest in doing a similar column on math and sports," said Sills, who majored in engineering and management systems at Princeton.

NEWS | 03/27/2000

The Daily Princetonian

Students work to continue summer service programs in Latin America

Since 1994, Princeton students have traveled to Belize for the summer ? teaching adult education classes, coordinating summer camps and beautifying national parks ? to help some of Latin America's less fortunate.But last spring, when the University reduced financial support for the trip, one student and two alumni mobilized to form Princeton Programs with the International Community to ensure that the service program they had enjoyed would continue."[The trip] didn't fit the University's strict educational mission and they wanted to alter some things," said PPIC co-founder and past-president Aaron Michels '00 of the University's decision that prompted him, Sarah Betrucci '98 and Chad Oliver '98 to find other ways to support the Belize trips.According to Associate Dean of Religious Life Sue Anne Steffey Morrow, the University's office of risk management decided the trips to Belize were "not sufficiently in line with the University's primary mission of the education of its students to be a worthy risk."PPIC ? a nonprofit organization that thrives on tax-deductible donations from foundations and individuals ? funds nine-week summer trips to Belize's St.

NEWS | 03/26/2000