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Morrison Hall, home of the U. undergraduate admissions office.
Courtesy of Nick Donnoli and the Office of Communications.

Dropping standardized testing requirements is changing the face of college admissions

The University should remember that although testing may serve as a barrier to many, it also allows students who succeed in testing environments to showcase their academic potential. While testing need not play the essential role it once did, the University should not disregard it altogether.

The University should remember that although testing may serve as a barrier to many, it also allows students who succeed in testing environments to showcase their academic potential. While testing need not play the essential role it once did, the University should not disregard it altogether.

OPINION | February 1

Vice President Kamala Harris
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

It’s pronounced “comma-la”. Get it right.

Quite frequently during the Biden-Harris campaign did I hear one of my friends mispronounce Harris’ name; I am sure Princeton’s ears will be no strangers to the occasional “Ka-MA-la” over the next four years. I believe we have a civic and moral duty to kindly correct this mistake when we hear it.

Quite frequently during the Biden-Harris campaign did I hear one of my friends mispronounce Harris’ name; I am sure Princeton’s ears will be no strangers to the occasional “Ka-MA-la” over the next four years. I believe we have a civic and moral duty to kindly correct this mistake when we hear it.

OPINION | January 31

TapTheForwardAssist | Wikimedia Commons

America isn't better than the events of Jan. 6

After further interrogation, however, I realized that instead of the question, ‘Is this who we really are’, the question really worth asking is: ‘Why are we so surprised that this is the country we live in?’. 

After further interrogation, however, I realized that instead of the question, “Is this who we really are?”, the question really worth asking is: “Why are we so surprised that this is the country we live in?” 

OPINION | January 21

GoToVan / Wikimedia Commons

Not scars, but bleeding wounds: A response to Rebekah Adams ’21 of The Princeton Tory

The last thing Black Americans need is one more successful individual to assume a paternalistic role, pointing fingers at the Black community’s faults without addressing why they exist. Being cognizant of discrimination has nothing to do with a “victimhood mentality” as Adams maintains. It has everything to do with breaking free from delusion.

The last thing Black Americans need is one more successful individual to assume a paternalistic role, pointing fingers at the Black community’s faults without addressing why they exist. Being cognizant of discrimination has nothing to do with a “victimhood mentality” as Adams maintains. It has everything to do with breaking free from delusion.

OPINION | January 12

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Novogratz Bridge Year participants in Indonesia.
Marissa Michaels / The Daily Princetonian

After students experienced racism abroad, Bridge Year failed to act. Performative efforts today are too little, too late.

My conversations with Bridge Year alumni reveal the harsh reality that the well-being of students of color has not been a priority for the Bridge Year administration. And now, it appears the administration is only taking action because student concerns have become too loud to ignore.  

OPINION | December 20

Inci Karaaslan / The Daily Princetonian

What Princeton students can learn from selective storytelling in ‘The Crown’

I cannot help but wonder if this is the story Netflix should be telling. Why seek to humanize the leaders of a violent, oppressive empire, while depicting the lives of the Black and brown people they harmed as mere backdrops? I understand that this is perhaps the way those people existed within the lives of royals, but why are we giving these royals the privilege of remaining relevant in our lives? 

OPINION | December 20

Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

In praise of his folly: Newman’s empty crusade against elitism

The elitism identified by Newman is all too prevalent. But he is not the antidote; he is its logical extension. The only way to differentiate oneself from Princeton’s elitism is to actually help the world and topple people like Newman from their thrones of self-styled cultural supremacy.  And it is this consciousness, rather than the subpar model of a Gatsby, that should animate any practice that seeks not only to overcome the standard Princeton elitism, but the self-humiliating pretensions of Newman himself.

The elitism identified by Newman is all too prevalent. But he is not the antidote; he is its logical extension. The only way to differentiate oneself from Princeton’s elitism is to actually help the world and topple people like Newman from their thrones of self-styled cultural supremacy.  And it is this consciousness, rather than the subpar model of a Gatsby, that should animate any practice that seeks not only to overcome the standard Princeton elitism, but the self-humiliating pretensions of Newman himself.

OPINION | December 20

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

What we can learn from the Scott Newman controversy

Read in one light, Newman’s account paints a fairly innocuous picture of a naïve young person whose short-term ambitions have repeatedly gotten in the way of his long-term goals. But there is a critical omission in Newman’s public telling of this story: his own agency in navigating a system he condemns as corrupting and beyond repair. 

Read in one light, Newman’s account paints a fairly innocuous picture of a naïve young person whose short-term ambitions have repeatedly gotten in the way of his long-term goals. But there is a critical omission in Newman’s public telling of this story: his own agency in navigating a system he condemns as corrupting and beyond repair. 

OPINION | December 20

McCosh Health Center.
Mark Dodici / The Daily Princetonian

2020: An ugly but necessary memory

With two vaccines for COVID-19 entering new phases of testing, a semester on campus, and a new year fast approaching, some people are justifiably itching to move on. These developments should undoubtedly be celebrated, as should the prospect of a fresh start. But, just like my friend, we cannot forget everything we have been through: Instead, should find creative and healthy ways to catalogue all that has happened in 2020.

OPINION | December 6

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 06: (EXCLUSIVE COVERAGE)   Harry Styles attends The 2019 Met Gala Celebrating Camp: Notes on Fashion at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 06, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/MG19/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue)

Who are these ‘manly men’?

The phrase “bring back manly men” sets our society back years. Men, no matter their assigned sex, should be able to dress how they want. But this is an issue that is bigger than wardrobe. Society perpetuates the idea that men have to be strong or “manly” all the time. The term “manly” already confines men into a box, but this idea actually creates more harm for men themselves. 

OPINION | December 6

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Housing must revise and clarify its disability accommodations process for on-campus spring

Allowing disabled students control over their roommates and implementing a reasonable, transparent, and well-advertised appeals process are absolutely non-negotiable for the University to truly attend to the needs of its disabled student community. This is especially true because the Housing Accommodations process has been historically unreliable, and in particular, explicitly discriminatory against students with mental and invisible disabilities.

OPINION | December 3