Sports

Patrick Brucki and Princeton wrestling will look to build off last year’s success.
Photo Courtesy of Beverly Schaefer / GoPrincetonTigers.com

Burn the ships: wrestling looks ahead to 2019-2020 season

Last year, No. 11 Princeton wrestling pulled off what head coach Christopher Ayres called “the greatest collegiate athletic turnaround of all time.” The team had spent the year urging their fans to #GetIn: to buy into their program, to hop on board before the bandwagon did. Now Princeton wrestling is back, and the Tigers aren’t satisfied. Getting in isn’t enough. They want to burn the ships.

SPORTS | November 21

The football team will face a radically altered season.
Jack Graham / The Daily Princetonian

‘Building Monsters’: Football, food, and fitness at Princeton

On Princeton’s biggest eaters sweatshirts, sweatpants, backpacks, and hats are emblazoned two words: Princeton Football. Football players commit themselves to the team’s grueling practice and game schedule; they are expected as well to change their bodies for the good of the game. How do Princeton’s football players manage to pack on the pounds without sacrificing the fitness and dexterity that allowed them to play at the University in the first place? 

FEATURES | November 21

Cadet Eliza Ewing ’20.
Photo Credit: Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

‘Preparing for the battlefield’: Athletics and leadership in ROTC

They woke up as first-years and seniors, history majors and engineers, Oklahomans and Connecticut natives. They pulled on standard-issue shirts, shorts, socks, strapped on their running watches. Some of them double-checked to make sure their shaves were clean. And somewhere in the walk from each of their dorms to Jadwin Gym, that group of individual students became something else entirely: a platoon of Army cadets. 

FEATURES | November 15

The rafters above Princeton’s Jadwin Gym.
Photo Credit: Jonathan Schilling / Wikimedia Commons

Examining compensation to college athletes

Ultimately, the arguments that defend the status quo in college sports reflect only a single viewpoint. Often, they fail to consider what profiting from one’s own likeness or from ticket sales could do for athletes who may not be able to reach professional level but still face the pressure of supporting their family, maintaining a very limited education, and finding time for physical and mental health.

SPORTS | November 13