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The Louis A. Simpson Building, which houses the Davis International Center.
Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Graduate students, U. react to proposed DHS rule limiting student visas

“By taking their talent, labour and research agendas to US universities, international students contribute to the research output of the US and to its global reputation for educational excellence,” Gordon-Smith wrote. 

In an interview with the ‘Prince,’ PGSU expressed hopes that “the University steps up … not just rhetorically but materially” to “support international students right now, not by further marginalizing them or making this out to be an issue that can be dealt with through rhetoric, through emails and through statements, but by actually making this type of concrete commitment that treats international students as an equally integral part of this community as domestic students.”

NEWS | October 14

Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

U. reaches $1.175 million settlement over pay disparities involving female professors

On Sept. 30, the Trustees of Princeton University reached a $1.175 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Labor over allegations of compensation discrimination involving 106 female full professors between 2012 and 2014.

On Sept. 30, the Trustees of Princeton University reached a $1.175 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Labor over allegations of compensation discrimination involving 106 female full professors between 2012 and 2014.

News | October 14

Wallace D. Best, Professor of Religion and African American Studies and Director of the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Courtesy of Sameer A. Khan / Fotobuddy via Office of Communications

Best becomes first Black, first male director in Gender and Sexuality Studies program history

Wallace D. Best, a professor of Religion and African American Studies, is the first Black and the first male director of the program in its 38-year history. 

Wallace D. Best, a professor of Religion and African American Studies, is the first Black and the first male director of the program in its 38-year history. 

NEWS | October 13

A promotional flyer for the event.
Courtesy of Association of Black Princeton Alumni

ABPA hosts alumni panel on voter suppression, stakes of 2020 election

“Black lives matter, but history indicates that Black lives matter more in this country when we vote,” Roberts said.

The panel featured U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Craig Robinson ’83, Professor Eddie S. Glaude, Jr. GS ’97, Andrea Campbell ’04, Tessa Kaneene ’07, Walter Jones ’85, Morgan Jerkins ’14, and Paul Roberts ’85, with Cheryl Scales ’84 as moderator.

NEWS | October 13

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Jon Ort / The Daily Princetonian

Another semester in fine print

This is a time for us to recognize just how hard all of us are working to stay afloat, and to reward that hard work with positive reinforcement and compassion. It would do us well to accept “the state of the world” as a valid reason for lethargy and shorthand for the multifaceted but difficult-to-explain circumstances that make it challenging for us to be our best selves right now—emotionally, socially, and academically. 

OPINION | October 13

Courtesy of Sameer A. Khan / Fotobuddy

Major gift from Mellody Hobson ’91 will establish new residential college on the site of First College

Hobson College, named after Ariel Investments co-CEO Mellody Hobson ’91, will be the first residential college at the University named after a Black woman.

Hobson College, named after Ariel Investments co-CEO Mellody Hobson ’91, will be the first residential college at the University named after a Black woman.

NEWS | October 8

What COVID-19 has shown us about our political culture

In the United States, empathy has become a partisan value, when in fact it should be a human one. This is a national emergency, a national time of grief, and a national time of mobilization in and outside of government regardless of political leanings. Unfortunately, we have seen shaky measures at best because the question has become not, “What can the government do?” but rather, “Should the government do anything at all?” 

OPINION | October 8