News

Two-ply toilet paper reaches Harvard University dorms

Although U.S. News & World Report may rank both Harvard University and Princeton as number one, Harvard recently took the lead in the crusade for two-ply toilet paper on campus.According to a Harvard Crimson article, Harvard maintenance officials are in the process of switching from one-ply to two-ply toilet paper in campus dormitories and bathrooms.Crimson columnist Geoffrey Upton published a column last December that initiated the change.

NEWS | 07/13/1992

University expands financial aid to low-income, foreign students

Boldly expanding the University's commitment to provide financial aid to lowerand middle-income students, the Board of Trustees approved January 24 what it called "the most important changes in Princeton's financial aid policies in several decades."The trustees' passage of a plan to spend approximately an additional $1.5 million in financial aid per class, beginning with the Class of 2002, was approved as part of the $572 million operating budget for 1998-99.

NEWS | 07/13/1992

Jennings to delay Olympics if snow does not stick today

When the most substantial snow the campus has seen in 1998 began falling yesterday, Class of 2000 president Jen Jennings received numerous e-mails and calls from anxious sophomores wanting to know if the time had finally arrived for this year's Nude Olympics.A combination of dropping temperatures and steadily falling snow initially suggested that students might be frolicking in the flurries by midnight.

NEWS | 07/27/1992

Police blame theft of WPRB CDs on former disc jockey

A 17-year-old former WPRB disc jockey has been charged with theft for allegedly stealing hundreds of compact discs from the radio station after selling some of them to a local record store, WPRB officials said yesterday.Princeton Borough Police believe that a total of 240 CDs, with a value close to $2,000, were taken during Winter Recess from the station's music office in Holder Hall.

NEWS | 07/27/1992

PriCom proposes larger aid awards

The Priorities Committee's proposal to increase University financial aid by $6 million over the next four years ? and the method by which it will be awarded ? would alter University practices and may change national higher-education procedure.The annual operating budget recommendations made by Provost Jeremiah Ostriker and PriCom to President Shapiro and the Board of Trustees at last Wednesday's U-Council meeting would change the structure of the financial-aid process in three significant ways.The plan would drastically decrease the weight placed on home equity in financial aid awards, package loans as grants to international students and may allow lower-income international students to attend the University.Proposed increases in financial aid will not extend to current students.

NEWS | 07/27/1992

Safety issues prompt installation

The historic steps of Blair Arch received a controversial upgrade in the first few days of Winter Break ? four gray pole railings.Upon returning to campus and seeing the railings, a number of students have raised concerns about their effect on the aesthetics of the arch."I think they're ugly, aesthetically unpleasing and unnecessary," Kevin Linder '98 said.

NEWS | 08/06/1992

Saudi group grants prize of $200,000 to Wiles for proof of Fermat's Last Theorem

Mathematics Professor Andrew Wiles has grabbed the spotlight once again ? this time for winning a 1998 King Faisal International Prize, a Saudi Arabian award that recognizes achievements in science and literature.Wiles leapt to international fame four years ago when he announced that he had proved Fermat's Last Theorem, long considered one of the world's great unsolved mathematical mysteries.Recognition for the 44-year-old professor has not been in short supply.

NEWS | 08/06/1992

Recruiting process heats up early for clubs

This year, sophomores will have an extra incentive to procrastinate at the 'Street' instead of staring at blank computer screens during Reading Period.Because sign-ins will take place the Sunday before the start of the spring semester ? four days earlier than in past years ? clubs will have to concentrate their recruiting efforts in the next few weeks.Campus Club president Kevin Moriarty '98 said his club is "focusing most of (its) recruiting on reading and finals weeks."To attract sophomores, the clubs are hosting the usual series of study breaks, DJs and bands ? only earlier.Besides social events, the Sophomore Choice Book ? which explains the different dining options ? and informal information sessions hosted by the residential colleges present sophomores with their choices.Initiated by Interclub Advisor Michael Jackman '92, this year's sessions will include general explanations of various eating options and a clarification of the sign-in and bicker processes.

NEWS | 08/06/1992

Two new stores may occupy Woolworth's space

Better label those parkas: the prospect of even more North Face jackets on campus just got bigger.Within the next thirty days, Princeton Borough's Historic Pres-ervation Committee will review the final application filed by Woolworth's parent company to bring a Colorado store and a Foot Locker to the former site of the discount chain store, Zoning Officer Frank Slimak said.Woolworth and Company Inc. owns Colorado ? an outdoor clothing chain ? and Foot Locker.Last month, Jeff Clark, an architect with WJCA Inc., submitted a "preliminary application" for review, proposing changes in the facade of 116 Nassau St.

NEWS | 08/06/1992

Investments serve to increase University funds

To the tune of "Under the Sea," the Nassoons recently sang the following in Richardson Auditorium to the amusement of students and alumni: No need to pay the 30 grand When you've got fiscal sleight of hand No need for dollar When you're a scholar Princeton is free.If only this were true.A $30,000-per-year education certainly generates a significant portion of the University's operating budget.

NEWS | 08/08/1992

Singleton '98 earns Rhodes Scholarship, third for University

Ships may have been lost in the fog of the Bermuda Triangle, but this Bermudian was not lost in his quest for a Rhodes Scholarship.The University is ringing in 1998 with the announcement of this academic year's third Rhodes scholar, as Colm Singleton '98 has claimed his colony's only Rhodes prize.Singleton, a history major specializing in imperialism and colonialism, plans to study law during his two or three years at Oxford University.

NEWS | 08/08/1992