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Arts

Brad Giovanine, Tavi Gevinson, Ethan Slater, Whit K. Lee,  and Katrina Yaukey in “Assassins” at Classic Stage Company.
Julieta Cervantes / Courtesy of Classic Stage Company

Bringing back Broadway: Princeton artists and students return to New York City theaters

After months with the curtains drawn closed, theaters in New York City have finally been welcoming back artists and audiences. Among the returners are Princeton’s students and professional artists who are excited to be in the room yet also cognizant that so much has changed for live theater.

After months with the curtains drawn closed, theaters in New York City have finally been welcoming back artists and audiences. Among the returners are Princeton’s students and professional artists who are excited to be in the room yet also cognizant that so much has changed for live theater.

THE PROSPECT | 1 day ago

Clockwise from top left: Allie Mangel ’22, Karina Wugang ’24, Adrian Rogers ’23, and Emily Liushen ’22, surrounded by members of Princeton Camerata. 
Courtesy of Li Lin Photography

Princeton Camerata's ‘Reprise’: A celebration of the joy of music-making

The concert was an evening free of judgement and affectation, focused on the beauty of the music and the relationships between performers, rather than the stuffy practices of more traditional or formal concerts.  

The concert was an evening free of judgement and affectation, focused on the beauty of the music and the relationships between performers, rather than the stuffy practices of more traditional or formal concerts.  

THE PROSPECT | November 18

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

‘Beautiful World, Where Are You’: Sally Rooney’s frustratingly surface-level novel

Contributing Writer Thia Bian reviews Sally Rooney’s newest novel, “Beautiful World Where Are You,” arguing that while the novel interrogates the place of love and beauty in a falling world, it fails to provide a satisfying resolution or exploration of these difficult questions.

Contributing Writer Thia Bian reviews Sally Rooney’s newest novel, “Beautiful World Where Are You,” arguing that while the novel interrogates the place of love and beauty in a falling world, it fails to provide a satisfying resolution or exploration of these difficult questions.

THE PROSPECT | November 15

The curtain call at Theatre Intime’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ 
Courtesy of Elliot Lee

Theatre Intime’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: a lovely middle ground

Theatre Intime’s production of “Much Ado About Nothing,” the Bard of Avon’s silly enemies-to-lovers comedy, opened on Friday, Nov. 12 and will occur three more times this weekend.

Theatre Intime’s production of “Much Ado About Nothing,” the Bard of Avon’s silly enemies-to-lovers comedy, opened on Friday, Nov. 12 and will occur three more times this weekend.

THE PROSPECT | November 15

Richardson Auditorium before the concert. 
Albert Lee / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton Glee Club performs in third Hand in Hand concert

The free event, which took place in Richardson Auditorium, consisted of a performance from Princeton students and sets from the Harvard and Yale Glee Clubs. The concert was a collaborative effort between the three universities to raise money for the nonprofit “Save the Music,” which funds public school music programs in New Jersey, Connecticut, and Massachusetts.

The free event, which took place in Richardson Auditorium, consisted of a performance from Princeton students and sets from the Harvard and Yale Glee Clubs. The concert was a collaborative effort between the three universities to raise money for the nonprofit “Save the Music,” which funds public school music programs in New Jersey, Connecticut, and Massachusetts.

THE PROSPECT | November 15

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Sir Paul McCartney, left, and Paul Muldoon, right
“Paul McCartney” by Jerzy Bednarski / CC BY 4.0
“Paul Muldoon” by summonedbyfells / CC BY 2.0 

Paul McCartney publishes book ‘The Lyrics’ edited by Prof. Muldoon

“The Lyrics” is a two-volume, 960-page “self-portrait” of McCartney told through 154 of his songs, along with commentaries, photos, and other notes from his life.

“The Lyrics” is a two-volume, 960-page “self-portrait” of McCartney told through 154 of his songs, along with commentaries, photos, and other notes from his life.

NEWS | November 8

Sydney Peng / The Daily Princetonian

Conan Gray’s ‘Telepath’: why less is more

“Telepath” is an amalgamation of old and new. While the track is nostalgic, reminiscent of ’80s disco music, the lyrics detail the ever-so-relatable experience of a dying relationship.  

“Telepath” is an amalgamation of old and new. While the track is nostalgic, reminiscent of ’80s disco music, the lyrics detail the ever-so-relatable experience of a dying relationship.  

THE PROSPECT | November 8

The Tigertones perform at a 1879 Hall arch sing this month. 
Cathleen Weng / The Daily Princetonian

Princeton a cappella returns to campus after a two-year hiatus

Gideon McFarland ’22 said that while Old NasSoul lost a lot during the pandemic, the time away gave the group space to evaluate itself and think intentionally about how to move forward: “I think it'll be a great year of new music and exciting performances and we can't wait to share it all with the campus community.”

Gideon McFarland ’22 said that while Old NasSoul lost a lot during the pandemic, the time away gave the group space to evaluate itself and think intentionally about how to move forward: “I think it'll be a great year of new music and exciting performances and we can't wait to share it all with the campus community.”

THE PROSPECT | November 7

Aster Zhang / The Daily Princetonian

Combining piano and tap dance, Tao, Teicher stun and reinvent at Richardson Hall

This is the kind of music that overturns what you thought you knew about everything you’ve heard before. It makes you, sitting up on stage with the performers, think, “Jesus, what have I been listening to for my entire life?” 

This is the kind of music that overturns what you thought you knew about everything you’ve heard before. It makes you, sitting up on stage with the performers, think, “Jesus, what have I been listening to for my entire life?” 

THE PROSPECT | November 4

Sections of the stained glass sculpture in front of the Princeton Art Museum have been removed as a part of major renovations. 
Candace Do / The Daily Princetonian

The arts at Princeton without the art museum

The closure of the Princeton University Art Museum, in conjunction with the shutdown of the museum during the COVID-19 pandemic, has affected the ways that many students, faculty, and members of the local community interact with the arts and humanities on campus.  

The closure of the Princeton University Art Museum, in conjunction with the shutdown of the museum during the COVID-19 pandemic, has affected the ways that many students, faculty, and members of the local community interact with the arts and humanities on campus.  

THE PROSPECT | October 28

Cammie Lee / The Daily Princetonian

‘The French Dispatch’ is totally camp — but that's what makes it so great

“Heralded as Wes Anderson’s “love letter to journalism,” the film follows the ins and outs of a fictional American newspaper called “The French Dispatch of the Liberty Kansas Evening Sun,” based out of the also fictional French city of Ennui-sur-Blasé.”

“Heralded as Wes Anderson’s “love letter to journalism,” the film follows the ins and outs of a fictional American newspaper called “The French Dispatch of the Liberty Kansas Evening Sun,” based out of the also fictional French city of Ennui-sur-Blasé.”

THE PROSPECT | October 26

Ellie Makar-Limanov / The Daily Princetonian

Reflecting on travel through the lives of 20th century philosophers

Contributing Writer Tommy Goulding examines how travel abroad informed the work of 20th century existentialists to consider what the loss of travel due to COVID-19 means for Princeton students.

Contributing Writer Tommy Goulding examines how travel abroad informed the work of 20th century existentialists to consider what the loss of travel due to COVID-19 means for Princeton students.

THE PROSPECT | October 24

A scene from the ending of "Sniper"
Sydney Eck / The Daily Princetonian

Theatre Intime’s first show is emotionally raw and complex, opening amid controversy and sparking conversation

“Sniper,” a play by Bonnie Culver, produced by Princeton’s Theatre Intime, is a compassionate telling of a story rife with grief and amorality. The play is a fictionalized portrayal of the life of a mass shooter and the irrevocable consequences of his actions. To carry the weight of such a sensitive narrative with grace and clarity is near impossible. The cast and crew of “Sniper” boldly shoulder this burden. 

“Sniper,” a play by Bonnie Culver, produced by Princeton’s Theatre Intime, is a compassionate telling of a story rife with grief and amorality. The play is a fictionalized portrayal of the life of a mass shooter and the irrevocable consequences of his actions. To carry the weight of such a sensitive narrative with grace and clarity is near impossible. The cast and crew of “Sniper” boldly shoulder this burden. 

THE PROSPECT | October 8

Patrons survey the art at Princeton Makes on its opening day.
Auhjanae McGee / The Daily Princetonian

New arts co-op Princeton Makes welcomes local artists looking for community

Princeton Makes is the brainchild of Jim Levine, who used word-of-mouth to spread information about his new art cooperative, where artists have the opportunity to use studio spaces and sell their work on consignment.

Princeton Makes is the brainchild of Jim Levine, who used word-of-mouth to spread information about his new art cooperative, where artists have the opportunity to use studio spaces and sell their work on consignment. 

THE PROSPECT | September 23

Courtesy of Cassandra James

Saturnia Arts founders give behind-the-scenes look at their organization

Founded by two sisters during the COVID-19 pandemic, Saturnia Arts connects artists with people who want art, whether for themselves or others. Senior Writer for The Prospect Cathleen Weng sat down with Cassandra James ’23 and Kate James to discuss their experience creating and running the project.

Founded by two sisters during the COVID-19 pandemic, Saturnia Arts connects artists with people who want art, whether for themselves or others. Senior Writer for The Prospect Cathleen Weng sat down with Cassandra James ’23 and Kate James to discuss their experience creating and running the project.

THE PROSPECT | September 22