The University admitted 785 students from a pool of 4,229 candidates for the class of 2020 through the single-choice early action program, representing the largest number of early-admits in the University’s recent history, according to University Dean of Admissions Janet Rapelye.

This figure represents an 18.6 percent acceptance rate. 767 students had been admittedlast Decemberearly action for the Class of 2019, and714 studentshad been admitted through early action for the Class of 2018.

The University's undergraduate admission office mailed notification letters to students today, and the decisions were available to applicants via secure online access around3 p.m. EST.

Rapelye noted that this year represents the first time that the University admitted more women than men. Fifty-one percent of the early admits are women and 49 percent are men.

“We are very pleased with the diversity of this group,” Rapelye said.

According to Rapelye, the admitted students come from 33 countries and all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia except Kentucky, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. Eleven percent of the admitted students are international students and 42 percent of the admitted students are U.S. students from diverse backgrounds.

In addition, Rapelye said, 56 percent of the students who were admitted attended public schools, and 13 percent are the first in their families to attend college. Sixteen percent of the admitted students are sons or daughters of University alumni, while 21 percent of the admitted students said that they intended to major in engineering.

Though some families have not completed their financial aid applications, Rapelye explained that she expects the final admit pool to demonstrate financial needs comparable to those from past years. Around 60 percent of University students receive need-based grant, and grants are on average above $40,000 each year.

“The committee worked very hard in putting together this class. It is always a challenge for us because even with taking more students, we couldn’t include all of the qualified applicants,” she said.

Rapelye said that for the majority of candidates who were deferred, the foremost priority is to maintain their high academic performances.

“We will look very carefully at their senior grades and senior performance. We will give them a very thorough read again,” Rapelye said.

She added that the University looks forward to welcoming admitted students to campus and to re-reading the applications of the students who have been deferred.

The early admit rate was 19.9 percent in 2014, compared with 18.5 percent in 2013, 18.3 percent in 2012 and 21.1 percent in 2011.

Students admitted through early action will be invited to TigerTuesday, an orientation event that will take place next February. All admitted students have untilMay 1to respond to their offer.

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