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Michael Granovetter


Articles

'No justice, no peace' for Michael Brown, students protest

At its peak, over 300 students marched in protest along Prospect Avenue starting at midnight Tuesday morning chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,“ “No justice, no peace” and “Black lives matter,” in what was probably the largest public protest at the University in recent years. The protest occurred the night before Thanksgiving break, a night known for students going out to the eating clubs — also located along Prospect Avenue — and partying before leaving campus for the rest of the week. The protest looped around both sides of the Street against the backdrop of a separate group of students that vied for entry into one of Princeton’s 11 eating clubs. The protests occurred hours after a grand jury ruled that Darren Wilson, a policeman from the suburbs of St.


TigerHub replaces SCORE; ICE may be phased out in future

The Office of the Registrar and Office of Information Technology launched TigerHub, a new online studentportal that replaced the Student Course Online Registration Engine, on Monday. The system will continue to serve a similar purpose to its predecessor, allowing students to modify course enrollments, view grades and request copies of transcripts. The design of individual pages of SCORE has been maintained in TigerHub, but students can now more easily navigate the platform, as all of the portal’s features are listed in a single menu on the system’s homepage, University Registrar Polly Griffin said.


Gas leak may have been caused by digging outside marked-out area

The Dec. 2 gas leak outside of Eno Hall that caused 500 individuals to evacuate 11 campus buildings may have been caused by digging outside the area that had been approved by state public utilities company PSE&G, according to PSE&G spokesperson Kristine Lloyd. The leak occurredwhen a backhoe struck a gas main while construction workers were working.


Orefice leaves position as Dining Services executive director

After serving as executive director of Dining Services for 21 years, Stu Orefice left his position at the University last Monday to pursue a consulting job in New York City. “It was time for me to create a new recipe,” Orefice wrote in an announcement sent to his friends and colleagues, adding, “I am extremely proud [of] the work of our award-winning dining team, and I take comfort in the fact that I leave the Princeton pantry fully stocked with high quality ingredients.” In his message to coworkers, Orefice explained that he hopes his job transition will allow him more flexibility to spend more time with his family.


Victory pyre warms students in freezing weather

On the first day of the semester with temperatures that failed to reach above freezing, students, faculty, staff and townspeople huddled for warmth around a bonfire on Cannon Green to celebrate the football team’s victory in the Big Three for the second year in a row.


Tower numbers drop while overall fall Bicker figures remain steady

Tower Club, the most popular club for the fall Bicker season last year, saw its number of bickerees drop by almost half this year, from 66 students in 2012 to 34 this year. The drop returned fall bicker levels to normal, as last year's 66 bickerees was a 75 percent increase over the 38 who bickered in fall 2011. Despite the drop affecting Tower, a total of 125 students bickered clubs this fall, just a dozen short of the 137 students who bickered last September.


Preferred name policy to allow students to go by nicknames in U. directory

University students who go by a first name other than their legal one will now have the option to change their name in the student directory, University Registrar Polly Griffin announced in an email sent to the student body last week. Under this new “preferred name policy,” the email explained, students may designate their “preferred” name in the directory through SCORE. “As long as the use of this preferred name is not for the purposes of misrepresentation, the University acknowledges that a ‘preferred name’ can and should be used where possible in the course of University business and education,” Griffin stated in the email, adding, “We know that this feature is important to many students, and we are pleased to be able to offer this option.” Griffin deferred comment to University spokesperson Martin Mbugua, who explained that the administration had been discussing this policy change over the past several months after receiving numerous requests from students who prefer a name other than their formal one.