Support the ‘Prince’

Please disable ad blockers for our domain. Thank you!

Elliott Eglash


Articles

Meningitis vaccine consent form will not require students to waive rights

Those who wish to receive the emergency meningitis vaccine that the University is offering will not have to waive any rights before receiving it. Consent forms were made available over Thanksgiving break on theUniversity’s websiteand emailed to underage students in order to be signed by their parents.


4 graduate students awarded Jacobus Fellowships

Four graduate students were named winners of the Porter Ogden Jacobus Fellowship, Princeton’s top honor for graduate students, the University announced Friday. The students, James Pickett GS, Emily Vasiliauskas GS, Sonika Johri GS and Cristina Domnisoru GS, will receive funding for their final year of graduate study.The fellowship is awarded to those whose work has exhibited the highest scholarly excellence. Pickett, a Ph.D.


Arts and Transit Neighborhood restaurant seeks additional liquor license, though town limit has already been reached

A restaurant that will be locatedin the Arts and Transit Neighborhood is attempting to obtain a liquor license, even though the state has already given away its maximum number of licenses to the town of Princeton. To get around the lack of available licenses, Raoul Momo, head of Terra Momo Restaurant Group, applied for a concessionaire’s permit, a special kind of permission granted to businesses that the state deems to be of public benefit.


Delbanco, Katz discuss troubling trends in American higher education

Higher education has become dominated by a number of troubling trends over time, and students come to college with little sense of why they are there, Columbia University’s American Studies program director Andrew Delbanco argued in a conversation on Tuesday afternoon. In the course of the lecture, Delbanco and Wilson School professor Stanley Katz touched on a number of subjects about the state of education in the United States, from pre-kindergarten programs to higher education. Delbanco said that Americans increasingly see colleges as lavish institutions that fail to teach students effectively. “They’re wasteful, they’re inefficient, they’re not doing their job, and we have a problem,” he said of ordinary people's view of colleges. This attitude is reinforced by rising tuition fees, which are caused in turn by the increasing privatization of higher education, Delbanco explained. “Our public universities have been gutted,” he said, noting that public funds make up only 6 percent of the University of Virginia’s budget. Katz warned against public universities’ efforts to raise funds in the face of budget shortfalls, either through tuition increases or the admission of more out-of-state students. These strategies undercut the democratic purpose of public education in America, he said. Higher education has developed a “pernicious and perverse obsession with rankings,” Delbanco said.