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Sophomore Princeton record-holder Rylie Pease won her first Heps title with a throw of 43.72 (143-5). 

photo credit: GoPrincetonTigers


A solid showing at the Ivy League Heptagonal championships last weekend earned women’s track and field a fourth-place finish, one step up from its indoor fifth-place performance.

Sophomore Obiageri Amaechi earned a title, broke her own all-time Ivy League record, and posted the sixth-best discus throw in the NCAA with a mark of 57.95 (190-1). It earned her the title of Most Outstanding Field Performer of the meet, an award that recognizes the exceptional achievements of any female athlete competing in a non-running discipline. Also placing in the discus was sophomore Julia Harisay, who finished fifth, and first-year Jalah Morris in sixth.

The javelin throwers similarly had a day to remember. Sophomore Princeton record-holder Rylie Pease won her first Heps title with a throw of 43.72 (143-5), surpassing the second-place finisher from Penn by over five feet. First-year Emily Wilson placed third with a throw of 39.99 (131-2), moving into Princeton’s all-time top 10 list, while junior Reece Schachne finished fifth with a throw of 36.99 (121-4).

“Winning Heps was something I had my mind on since last year’s Heps,” said Pease. “I was so excited to be able to win and stand on the podium with my two teammates. The weather was horrible, but the three of us managed to go out early on Sunday morning and score 18 points for the team. I hope I can defend my title the next two years and also add a team Ivy League title as well.”

Wilson echoed Pease. “It was super exciting,” she said. “I’ve never been a part of a team championship before, and getting to score points for Princeton and compete for my teammates was such a cool feeling. I ended up placing higher than was projected to in the meet, and that’s definitely because of all my teammates were there to cheer us all on — even though it was freezing and raining.”

Junior Ellen Scott-Young grabbed second place in the hammer throw on her final attempt with a mark of 56.92 (186-9). Senior Kerri Davidson finished fifth in the triple jump with a mark of 12.40 (40-8.25), just off her personal best of 12.47 (40-11), which ranks second on Princeton’s all-time performance list.

In the pole vault, sophomore Alexandra Munson threw down a massive personal best to place second with 3.85 (12-7.5), after competing in only a few meets this season due to injury. First-year teammate Hanne Borstlap, who placed second at the indoor championships, came out in a tie for fourth with a jump of 3.70 (12-1.5).

On the distance side, senior Allie Klimkiewicz competed in both the 3000 meter steeplechase and 5000 meters. Despite poor weather conditions, Klimkiewicz kicked on the last lap of the steeplechase to pass one runner and clinch fifth place with a time of 10:25.33. In the 5000, Klimkiewicz grabbed fourth place with a time of 16:24.86, while sophomore Melia Chittenden joined her on the podium with a time of 16:35.33, placing sixth.

In the hurdles, the Tigers saw spectacular performances from seniors Carly Bonnet and Ellie Randolph. Bonnet ended her career on a high note this championship meet after breaking the 60-second barrier and placing fourth in the 400 meter hurdles with a time of 59.24, just off her personal best of 59.12 that she set in the prelims. Meanwhile, Randolph grabbed second in the 100 meter hurdles with a time of 13.77, only a hundredth of a second behind her personal best that she also achieved in the prelims.

“I’ve been working for four years to achieve something like this and I’m so happy to have been able to do it for my coach and the people whom I train with,” Randolph said.

Finally, senior Frances Lodge and sophomore Lindsey Schmidt placed third and sixth in the heptathlon, respectively. Lodge scored 4,826 points, achieving her best marks in the 800, javelin, and long jump. Schmidt captured 4,456 points with best marks in the long jump, javelin, and 800.

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