The University’s Program in Law and Public Affairs has announced a total of six fellows for the 2017-2018 academic year. The fellows will each give a public seminar while working on their own research. Some fellows will teach in either undergraduate or graduate departments.

“I’m writing the story of the feminist strategy in the AIDS epidemic,” Aziza Ahmed said. “In the early part of the epidemic, people thought women weren’t really vulnerable to contracting HIV.”

Ahmed went on to describe how it took the work of feminist lawyers to expand the definition of who was considered able to contract HIV. A law professor at Northeastern University School of Law, she teaches courses on International Health Law, Reproductive Health and Rights, and Property Law. She has served on various United Nations agencies and was a member of the United Nations Technical Advisory Group on HIV and the Law.

Another fellow, Celeste Arrington ’03, is the Korea Foundation Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University. She received her A.B. degree from the Wilson School.

According to Arrington, part of the appeal for becoming a fellow was that she is a University alumna herself. She said that the University has many “smart and interesting people doing great research.” She also said that she thinks it will be a stimulating research environment, and she looks forward to exchanging ideas with those who are looking at similar questions to hers, but in other parts of the world.

Jessica Eaglin is an Associate Professor of Law at Indiana University Maurer School of Law. She teaches courses on evidence and criminal law.

“Princeton has such a great intellectual community,” Eaglin said when asked what made her want to apply for this fellowship. “This would be a really great opportunity for me to start thinking about my research from different angles and interact with some of the leading scholars in the field.”

Lewis Grossman is a law professor at American University’s Washington College of Law. He won the Washington Engleson Historical Prize at Yale University for having the best dissertation on American history.

“I’m going to be discussing legal efforts and social movements throughout American history to ensure that people can take any kind of medicine they want and visit any kind of doctor they want,” Grossman said when describing the book he will be writing while at the University. He added how he was looking forward to spending the time on campus.

“I feel honored, delighted, excited — it’s unbelievable,” Grossman said.

Tomasz T. Koncewicz is a Professor of Law and the Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdansk in Poland. He is the author of many papers and 9 different books. At the University, he will be working on his project “The politics of resentment, European disintegration and constitutional capture: Rethinking the European overlapping consensus?”

Koncewicz was unavailable for comment at the time of publication.

Yüksel Sezgin is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Middle Eastern Studies Program at Syracuse University.

“I have wanted to apply for more than 10 years,” Sezgin said. He also noted how grateful he was for being chosen as a fellow for the upcoming academic year, calling the LAPA fellowship “one of the most prestigious scholarships in the country.”

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